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Teachers and books in our country have taught me like this when explaining types of the verbs.

There are 5 forms in English sentences.
1) Subject + Intransitive verb , For example, My wife sleeps.
2) Subject + Linking verb . For example, My wife is beautiful.
3] Subject + Transitive verb + Object, For example, My wife buys a wallet.
4] Subject + Dative verb + Indirect Object + Direct Object, For example, My wife gave me a new wallet.
[Q1)In fact, I don't know the exact meaning of "dative". I couldn't find the words for "dative verb" in MSN. Every words related to "dative verbs" was German. As they have taught me it, Now I'm regarding as these verbs similar to that of "give" verb. What do I call for this kind of verbs in English ? Just transitive verbs having 2 objects ? Anyway, In this thread, I'm calling it "dative verb". ]
5] Subject + Causative verb + Direct Object + Objective Complement, For example, My wife found me handsome.

And they have told me that there are verbs are used only for the 4th sentence form, which has 2 objects in any case. They are as follows,
"Ask,Award,Assure,Bring, buy, cost,convince, get, give, leave, lend, make, notify,offer, owe, pass, pay, play, promise, read, refuse,remind, send, show, sing, secure,take, teach, tell, wish, write"

And then,they have asked me to use 2 objects whenever I want to use a verb in the above.
For your understanding, I have to write or say like this according to their teachings.
I gave her a gift. (o) ..... I gave her(x), I gave a gift (x)

It is said that every verb called "dative verb" is applied to this rule in any case.

In any case ?
But, as you know well, there are a lot of dative verbs which can be okay even though using only 1 object.
Like this one, I asked him a question(o), I asked him(o). I asked a question. (o)
And also, when using them in passive form or with that clause, no require 2 objects! Isn't it right ? and the thing they have forget for explaining this rule, Even a verb can have a lot of meaning. For instance, It's the verb of "make". I can make it (o), I can make you all coffee(o/ this case,it's in 4th form), I made her very happy(o). Am I wrong ?

That's why I have thought they're absolutely wrong. I'd thought it by my self that every dative verb can have 1 object sometimes when a speaker needs to talk like that.
But finally this my idea was perfectly approved to be nonsense by a member in this forum 3 days ago.
So I've thought and study about it. Now I've made this result. It's like this.
"Some dative verbs can have 1 objects,but others can not."

Q2) Is my thought right that some dative verbs can have 1 objects,but some others can not ?

Q3] Could you tell me which verbs can used with 2 objects in any case like the verb of "give" ? If possible, in the dative list I've written.

Q4) Do these 2 verbs of "inform" and " advise" belong to "Dative verbs" or just " Transitive verb" ? I'm not sure about them.If they are dative verbs, why do they sometimes use it as " It's advised that clause"? Where is indirect object ?

Q5) The dative verb has this form that "Subject + Dative verb + Indirect Object + Direct Object ". But sometimes it seems that some dative verbs like "inform" have direct objects with prepositions. Now I want to ask you one more.
Dative verbs must not have prepositions with direct objects. Isn't this rule right ? If this rule is right, I have to regard the verb of "inform" just as "transitive verb" which we can so often use with 2 objects. I think this words is reasonable because I can say as "He informed me". Please confirm this matter.

Q6) Can I use only 1 object when I use those verbs under passive voice ? Like this. He was given a wallet (okay), He was given a wallet by her ( also okay) ?

Q7) I want to know it more exactly ,and if there is a web site I can refer to, please introduce it to me. I want to do it by my self. But in my dictionary, there isn't any explanation and example sentence.

Thank you in advance.
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Son JamesI don't know the exact meaning of "dative". I couldn't find the words for "dative verb" in MSN. Every words related to "dative verbs" was German. As they have taught me it, Now I'm regarding as these verbs similar to that of "give" verb. What do I call for this kind of verbs in English ? Just transitive verbs having 2 objects ?
"dative" comes from the Latin word for "give" because the verb "give" is the model verb for constructions with a dative element. The dative element of a sentence is also called the indirect object.

Similarly taken from a Latin word, "accusative" is equivalent to the direct object.

Verbs that take a dative element (an indirect object) and an accusative element (a direct object) are sometimes called ditransitive verbs.
Son JamesQ2) Is my thought right that some dative verbs can have 1 objects,but some others can not ?
That's right.
Son JamesQ3] Could you tell me which verbs can used with 2 objects in any case like the verb of "give" ? If possible, in the dative list I've written.
See below.
Son JamesQ4) Do these 2 verbs of "inform" and " advise" belong to "Dative verbs" or just " Transitive verb" ?
Just transitive because there is no form with "to". That is, you can't have "Inform this to him" or "Advise something to me", nor can you have "Inform him this" or "Advise me something". Those are all wrong.
Son JamesDative verbs must not have prepositions with direct objects. Isn't this rule right ?
See below.
Son JamesHe was given a wallet (okay), He was given a wallet by her ( also okay) ?
Both are OK. Yes.
Son JamesQ7) I want to know it more exactly ,and if there is a web site I can refer to, please introduce it to me. I want to do it by my self. But in my dictionary, there isn't any explanation and example sentence.
Your questions are so advanced that there is no website to refer to, as far as I know. Dictionaries do not include the kind of information you are looking for. You may have to research papers in linguistics. You may find some, but not all, of the answers to your questions in English Verb Classes and Alternations by Beth Levin if you can get access to that book.
_______________

Please read the material found in the following links. It explains dative alternations and the three kinds of ditransitive verbs that participate (or not) in these alternations. They are posts I have written on the subject over the years, and you may find them repetitive, but I think it would be worth your while to take a look at them.

Verbs with 2 objects
Question regarding linguistic mechanism.
Infinitives & Indirect objects.
Ditransitive Verb (Sentence formation)
To say in the passive
Prepositional and non prepositional indirect objects.
Objects

You will note that none of these posts answer the question of which elements (dative, accusative) are optional and which are required for any of the verbs discussed there. That's because students very rarely ask the question. They learn English by imitating the usage of native speakers rather than by memorizing rules. In fact, it's difficult to formulate exact rules because even native speakers sometimes disagree about how a verb can be used. Nevertheless, I have taken the time to list for you (below) the various possibilities for some of the verbs you may be interested in.
________________

As an example, look at the first verb below. "award" is listed with D A / A / A to D.

This means "award" can be used in these three ways:

We awarded him the prize.
We awarded the prize.
We awarded the prize to him.

But it cannot be used in other ways, such as
We awarded him.
because D is not listed beside "award".
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D - Dative element (indirect object)
A - Accusative element (direct object)

Alternating:

award D A / A / A to D
bring D A / A / A to D
give D A / A to D
lend D A / A to D
offer D A / A / A to D
pass D A / A / A to D
pay D A / A / D / A to D
grant D A / A to D
hand D A / A to D
mail D A / A / D / A to D
show D A / A / D / A to D
sell D A / A / A to D / to D
send D A / A / A to D
take D A / A / A to D
teach D A / A / D / A to D
tell D A / A / D / A to D
toss D A / A / A to D
write D A / A / D / A to D / to D

Non-alternating, double object only:

ask D A / A / D
bill D A / D
charge D A / A / D
cost D A / A
fine D A / D
guarantee D A / A
owe D A / A / D
promise D A / A / D
refuse D A / D
save D A / A
secure D A / A
spare D A / A / D
wish D A

Non-alternating, to only:

address A to D / A
contribute A to D / A / to D
convey A to D / A
deliver A to D / A
demonstrate A to D / A
describe A to D / A
distribute A to D / A
donate A to D / A / to D
explain A to D / A
recommend A to D / A
return A to D / A
transport A to D / A
_____________________

Note that some patterns are listed which are theoretically possible, but only used in certain ways. Not all patterns listed are equally idiomatic. The whole subject is so complex that I cannot write all the details for you in a single post. As I said above, you may need to research papers in linguistics if you wish to pursue this subject further.

CJ
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From what I can remember from my Latin class nearly a hundred years ago, dative is the name of a case for nouns. These nouns repreresent the indirect object, which is (usually) a person who receives the direct object. In English sentences, the indirect object normally comes before the direct object. [ dative in bold ] He gave me the book. She asked them a question. I told Mary a funny joke.
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Thank you for your answers. But what I want to know is whether or not using those verbs with only 1 object sometimes. It's like this. I asked them. I asked a question. I told Mary. I told a funny joke. Couldn't you answer my questions in my thread ? Thank you in advance.
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Ah~ You're a great and wonderful man! I really appreciate your answers. Thank you so much,Mr.CJ.