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Hi to all......I am really confused thinking about what is the difference in the meaning of the following examples:

1.I am going to think about it over the next few days.

2.I am going to think about it for the next few days.

3.I stayed at my friend's house for one year.

4. I stayed at my friend's house over one year.

is there any difference in the meaning of sentences with "over" and "for".....? I would be very grateful If you explained the use of "over" ,in the above examples, in details.....
Comments  
...is there any difference in the meaning of sentences with "over" and "for".....?-- They are often used synonymously (as in #3 and #4), but 'over' can sometimes mean, or be an ambiguous possibility, in such sentences as #1, where the thinking could occur during only a part of the 'next few days'.

Compare:

I'm going to visit you for the next week = I will visit you 7 times in 7 days
I'm going to visit you over the next week = I will visit you on one of the next 7 days
thank you very much........"Mister Micawber".......your explanation with examples was very helpful.........but I am still a little confused about the use of "over"....as in the following sentences;

1. she leaned over the table to receive a phone call.

(can't we use "upon" or "on" in place of "over" in the above example ?)

2. They discussed the matter thoroughly "over" the table.
(is it correct to use "over" in this sentence? ...and if yes....then please tell me why)
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1. she leaned over the table to receive a phone call. (can't we use "upon" or "on" in place of "over" in the above example ?-- No. With 'over', her body is not touching the table; with 'up(on)', her body is touching the table.)

2. They discussed the matter thoroughly "over" the table. (is it correct to use "over" in this sentence? ...and if yes....then please tell me why-- Yes: the table is between them and their voices are not touching the table)
thanks to you once again Sir, "Mister Micawber".....
sir.....how about "Onto" in our first example, can we say ;

she leaned "onto" the table to receive a phone call. (is it possible and if yes, then what would be the meaning of
our sentence ?).
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She put her elbows or one hand on the tabletop.
Emotion: smilemany thanks to you sir.......

Sir, I have read somewhere that we use "over" usually with "dynamic verbs or movement verbs" and "above"
with "static verbs".........sir, any sepcific reasons why do we do so ? .....could you please give a few examples
with explanation ? waiting for your reply !
No, there is no specific reason beyond usage. Several prepositions have different forms or alternatives for motion vs location:

Motion:

Moses went to the liquor store.
Jack jumped over the candlestick.
I carried my bags onto the ship.

Location:

I found Moses at the liquor store.
The clouds above me are white as snow.
My bags are on the ship
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