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Hi teachers!

I want to write something like the following:

1. M is the number of spatial units for which the parameter is defined.
2. M is the number of spatial units that the parameter is defined for.

Are these two sentences essentially the same?

Actually, the parameter is defined for "spatial units", not for "the number of spatial units." When I write "A of B which/that", does the which/that clause define "A of B" or just "B"?

Thank you for your time.
Cho
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Hi,

I want to write something like the following:

1. M is the number of spatial units for which the parameter is defined.
2. M is the number of spatial units that the parameter is defined for.

Are these two sentences essentially the same? Yes. #1 is more formal, more for writing. #2 is more typical of spoken English.

Actually, the parameter is defined for "spatial units", not for "the number of spatial units."
I'm not sure that I see the distinction you are making. Generally speaking, a parameter usually involves a number, regardless of whether you use the word 'number' in the parameter's name. In simple programming terms, you can call your parameter 'spatial units'' or 'number of spatial units' or even just 'M', and say either move 7 to number of spatial units or move 7 to spatial units or move 7 to M.

When I write "A of B which/that", does the which/that clause define "A of B" or just "B"? Generally speaking, I'd say it depends on the context and the context usually makes it clear.

What's a 'spatial unit'?

Best wishes, Clive
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The model was developed for the watershed, which has two sub-regions.

The watershed for which this model was developed has two sub-regions.
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Comments  
"The number of spatial units" is just an example that I came up with. Here, number has nothing to do with parameters. It's "the total number of spatial units".

What I wanted to ask is "how can I restrict the meaning of 'B' in 'A of B'?"

For example,

1. There are two sub-regions of the watershed.
2. The model was developed for the watershed.

How can I combine 1&2 with a which/that clause? Is it even possible?

As I know, if I write "There are two sub-regions of the watershed for which the model was developed.", it means the model was developed for two sub-regions of the watershed, which is not true.

Simply put, is it possible to say "A of B which/that describes B in this dependent cluase?"

Thank you.
Cho
 BarbaraPA's reply was promoted to an answer.
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