Reading this
http://www.janegalt.net/blog/archives/005173.html
I see
'Kudoes to the New York Times...'
I assume that the writer pronounces the word 'kudos' with a long final vowel, and Anglicised the spelling to match the pronunciation!

Similarly, I've heard 'Sri Lanka' pronounced by Americans with both vowels in 'Lanka' lengthened; and 'Costa Rica' with the 'o' lengthened. Spanish place-names in the US - 'Boca Raton', say - often get the same treatment. (But not always - 'Los Angeles' is, I believe pronounced generally with short vowels - even the final vowel, which some in England might pronounce long by false analogy with Latin.)

In each case, I believe, the vowel in the original language is short, and is pronounced as short in England.
I'm wondering whether this a recognised phenomenon.
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Reading this http://www.janegalt.net/blog/archives/005173.html I see 'Kudoes to the New York Times...' I assume that the writer pronounces the word 'kudos' ... in the original language is short, and is pronounced as short in England. I'm wondering whether this a recognised phenomenon.

What do you mean by 'long' and 'short' vowels?

"...each one of whom as he struck his enemy wounded horribly some other innocent heart far away."
Reading this http://www.janegalt.net/blog/archives/005173.html I see 'Kudoes to the New York Times...' I assume that the writer pronounces the word 'kudos' with a long final vowel, and Anglicised the spelling to match the pronunciation!

Perhaps. More likely (if this is different from (= PostRonBrE "different to") what you're saying) it involves taking the written word "kudos", reinterpreting it as the plural of "kudo", then thinking of the plural of "kudo" as "kudoes" and pronouncing (and writing) it accordingly.
Similarly, I've heard 'Sri Lanka' pronounced by Americans with both vowels in 'Lanka' lengthened;

Meaning what by "lengthened"? I think the usual AmE pronunciations of "Lanka" are /[email protected]/ and (less commonly I think) /[email protected]/.
and 'Costa Rica' with the 'o' lengthened.

I don't hear that much, I don't think. I'd expect to hear /[email protected]/ or /[email protected]/.
Spanish place-names in the US - 'Boca Raton', say - often get the same treatment.

Well, the "Boca" is always /[email protected]/, yes. I think I've usually heard the "Raton" as rhyming with "baton" (not the one in Baton Rouge, which is /[email protected] ruZ/).
(But not always - 'Los Angeles' is, I believe pronounced generally with short vowels

You might want to clarify what you mean by "short vowel". In CINCAmE, the "Los" is like "loss", which has the "caught" vowel (boss class). I don't really think of this as a "short vowel" in the phonics sense, though perhaps I should.
even the final vowel, which some in England might pronounce long by false analogy with Latin.)

The final vowel in modern-day "Los Angeles" is typically a schwa. In 1969 things might have been different.
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I give up. You pronounce "loss" with the vowel of "laws" or "pause" or "caught"?
You might want to clarify what you mean by "short ... "short vowel" in the phonics sense, though perhaps I should.

I give up. You pronounce "loss" with the vowel of "laws" or "pause" or "caught"?

Yes, much like True Unreconstructed RP (The Original (Accept No Cheap Imitations)).

Steny '08!
Reading this http://www.janegalt.net/blog/archives/005173.html I see 'Kudoes to the New York Times...' I assume that the writer pronounces the word 'kudos' ... the spelling to match the pronunciation! Similarly, I've heard 'Sri Lanka' pronounced by Americans with both vowels in 'Lanka' lengthened;

How's this? I can't imagine how the second vowel would be lengthened
and 'Costa Rica' with the 'o' lengthened. Spanish place-names in the US - 'Boca Raton', say - often get the ... In each case, I believe, the vowel in the original language is short, and is pronounced as short in England.

AmE doesn't have a native short vowel /o/ not followed by 'r' or 'l'.
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AmE doesn't have a native short vowel /o/ not followed by 'r' or 'l'.

Here I'm gonna pull a Sparky and say that that should be in square brackets to make sense. No? One cannot speak of a phonemic "short"/"long" vowel, as I understand things.
Also, I think you're wrong anyway. In Minnesotan English (e.g. HardE), doesn't raw short (o) occur all over the place?

Steny '08!
I give up. You pronounce "loss" with the vowel of "laws" or "pause" or "caught"?

Yes, much like True Unreconstructed RP (The Original (Accept No Cheap Imitations)).

Well, I still give up. You are perfectly right about the TURP but how on earth did you acquire it? I have never heard an American use that vowel in "loss' (though "laahss" seems common enough (no sneer intended)) Is this part of the Prestige Postwar New Yorkese (Nu Yaahkese)? Or does "much like" really mean "rather different from"?
AmE doesn't have a native short vowel /o/ not followed by 'r' or 'l'.

Here I'm gonna pull a Sparky and say that that should be in square brackets to make sense. No? One cannot speak of a phonemic "short"/"long" vowel, as I understand things.

I meant phonemes - the traditional "short" and "long" vowel phonemes in english are as follows (and as i assumed he meant)

"a" /&/ /eI/
"e" /E/ /i:/
"i" /I/ /aI/
"o" /A/ /oU/
"u" /V/ /ju:/
and, as i was saying, as a phoneme, /o/ (YES, i did mean slashes) doesn't exist not followed by 'r' or 'l'
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