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Hi,

P/S help me to be enlightened about the proper usage of the two words mentioned above and below.

forward and forwards
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AnonymousHi,

P/S help me to be enlightened about the proper usage of the two words mentioned above and below.

forward and forwards

Hi--
Some people prefer “forward” to “forwards,” but neither of these forms is really incorrect. "Forward" is a bit more formal, perhaps. There are a couple expressions in which only one of the two forms works, such as step forward and forward motion.

Cheers--
Lazarus
Hi,

Here is a simple approach.

You can use either of them as an adverb. eg He walked forward. He walked forwards.

You can use 'forward', but not 'forwards' as an adjective. But I wouldn't worry about that, because we don't use it a lot as an adjective.

There are a few exceptions, eg the standard expression 'I am looking forward to the party' where you can't use 'forwards'.

Best wishes, Clive
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CliveYou can use 'forward', but not 'forwards' as an adjective. But I wouldn't worry about that, because we don't use it a lot as an adjective.

Hi Clive--
Yes, I'd also add that in the U.S., the word "forwards" has virtually disappeared from everyday speech. I'm not sure if this is the case in the UK.

Lazarus
The word 'forwards' is still used in Britain. Though I'm not sure how much longer it will be around, as more and more of the younger generation seem to pick up their language from TV, and their interests seem to be dominated by American shows. The same with towards/toward. 'Towards' is British, while Americans largely prefer 'toward'. Recently I heard a BBC reporter say 'toward' and I heard another one say 'gotten'; Americanisms is something you'd never have heard British reporters use a decade or so ago.
AnonymousAmericanisms is something you'd never have heard British reporters use a decade or so ago.

Right you are! I never heard a British person say Hi! until the 1980s in London. That didn't bother me in the least, though. And as the regulars on these forums know Iwill make sure that there'll always be Finnishisms in English.Emotion: smile
CB
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Forward is the formal usage. Consider why there would be an "s" appended to forward in the first place. It is unnecessary and so it should be removed.
Lazarus Anonymous wrote:Hi,
P/S help me to be enlightened about the proper usage of the two words mentioned above and below.
forward and forwards
Hi--
Some people prefer “forward” to “forwards,” but neither of these forms
is really incorrect. "Forward" is a bit more formal,
perhaps. There are a couple expressions in which
only one of the two forms works, such as step forward and forward motion.
Cheers--
Lazarus
Hi--
It's interesting to note that if you "step forward" this means you are stepping to the fore, i.e. before people, not in a forward direction - nose in front. In the Pacific North-West, where I grew up, I would drive my car forwards or backwards. This indicates that the nose of the vehicle is either in front or in back. Thus I actually distinguish two adverbs "forward" = to the front, and "forwards" = with the nose in front. So don't step backwards onto the stage. But would I say I'm walking forwards or forward. Hmm!
Yours--
Jack
Hi--
There appears to be a correlation between driving backwards and forwards and having palindromes, words or phrases that can be read the same way both backwards and forwards. Here, of course, we have adverbs expressing orientation of an object to the direction of a motion or path direction.
I find it interesting that the use of "forwards" vs. "forward" might be defined according dialect splits in the English language. It would be more informative to investigate documented speech and writing where both word forms are used, since there actually are such speakers (Western Washington).
What kind of information could be found with regards to other s/0 vocabulary elements, e.g. toward/towards. Naturally, here we are not dealing with and adverb but a preposition.
I was able to find a document with the following usage:
Title: Progress Towards Goal.
Text: This field is where you enter the client's progress toward the stated goal.
Although, it might be disputed I would definitely prefer the use of "towards" with an "s" in the title, whereas in the text I feel comfortable with both.
Does this have anything to do with my interpretation of how English in titles and headings tend to be encapsulations?
Yours--
Rueter
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