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Salut tout le monde ! J'imagine que beaucoup d'entre vous êtes en vacances, ou presque. Moi non - j'aime tellement mon travail que je ne prends pas de jours fériés. La seule chose qui m'empêche de travailler, c'est le voyage. Ma famille va venir ici pendant 10 jours en janvier, donc à ce moment-là, j'aurai des vacances.

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Hi everyone! I imagine that a lot of you are on vacation, or nearly. Not me - I love my work so much that I don't take holidays off. The only thing that prevents me from working is travel. My family will be here for 10 days in January, so at that point I'll have a vacation.

An American who is good at French has written the above. I don't question about the French version. It is fine.

I think the following is not good English.
I imagine that a lot of you are on vacation, or nearly.

To write 'lot of you are on vacation, or nearly' is not good English.
What do you think?
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It is very colloquial, but quite understandable.

To be formal, you might say: I imagine that many of you are already on vacation or about to go on vacation.
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>I don't question about the French version.

I don't question the French version.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Comments  
I thank both Feebs11 and Marius for the replies.

I would agree with Feebs11's sentence. It sounds natural as well as proper.

Marius wrote the following:
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I don't question about the French version.

I don't question the French version.

What is wrong with the preposition about in the above sentence?
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RotterI thank both Feebs11 and Marius for the replies.

I would agree with Feebs11's sentence. It sounds natural as well as proper.

Marius wrote the following:
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I don't question about the French version.

I don't question the French version.

What is wrong with the preposition about in the above sentence?

We "ask/have a question about something", but we "question something".