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Hello everyone:)!

I've been reading "be friends with me" all this time and have always wondered if it was a correct sentence, is it a correct sentence?
I don't know, it somehow sounds odd to me...shouldn't it be "be my friend"?

Thank you in advance!
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to be friends with (someone) = to be on friendly terms with (someone)

It's correct.

Mary is friends with Marge.

(for two people) to be friends = to be on friendly terms with one another

Mary and Marge are friends.

CJ
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Hello CalifJim:)!

How would it be in the negative way? "Don't be friends with them?"

"I am a new member here and I am looking for people to be friends with me", would this sentence be correct?
So, "to be friends with (someone)" is not something reciprocal while the other one is, that's the difference, isn't it?

Mary is friends with Marge --> It doesn't mean that Marge is friendly with Mary, does it?

Thanks for answering my questions!:)
Don't be friends with them is fine. Also: Don't make friends with them.

I am looking for people to be friends with me is fine. Or: I hope to make friends here.

Usually you are not friends with someone you don't know; then you make friends with them; then, after that, you are friends with them. making friends is the action; being friends is the state.

Mary is friends with Marge --> It doesn't mean that Marge is friendly with Mary, does it? Yes, it usually does mean that. This expression almost always implies a reciprocal relationship. If not, you have to explain it: Mary is friends with Marge. At least she mistakenly thinks she is, because Marge is not friends with her. Without any evidence of the contrary, I always assume that the relationship is reciprocal.

CJ
Thanks once more, CalifJim!

I think I will have to get used to these sentences..Emotion: smile
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