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Whoa, do you actually watch PBS? Documentary series like Frontline take a far more antagonistic stance towards the government than ... 'private'?) stations, with the possible exception of C-SPAN. PBS executives are constantly being summoned before Congressional committees to explain themselves.

What they should be doing is explaining to their supporters why their programs are so inferior compared with those produced by the BBC and what they intend to do to improve the new ones. PBS these days, at least in my area, is barely worth watching if looking for adult shows, and then with only a small handful of programs. I remember when it was much better, but even in its heyday it only approached BBC quality: generally by airing old BBC programs or some from Canadian TV, not by airing what they produced themselves. Americans are not getting their money's worth.
One thing the US probably should have is a required TV license fee. Trouble is, we'd also need people of the quality the BBC has. Not an automatic assumption by any means, for Ireland, Land of Saints and Scholars, produces very little of interest even though it, like Britain, requires a hefty fee from all residents owning a TV. Luckily for many, if not most, Irish people, they are able to receive British TV even when they don't have cable or satellite.

Charles Riggs
They are no accented letters in my email address
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Many computer programmers also use the British style for similar reasons as the textual critics.

Or, indeed, because they are British, which means that they never came up against this rather strange hurdle.

Indeed.
-Peter

Peter Seibel (Email Removed)

Lisp is the red pill. John Fraser, comp.lang.lisp
It's like saying, "Last night I watched "Mask," a great film" instead of "Last night I watched "Mask", a great film."

But 'Mask' wasn't a great film. I thought it was rubbish; but then I only watched the first half.

Are you confusing "Mask" with "The Mask"? "Mask" is a marvelous story about a disfigured teen finding the love of a blind girl. It was Cher's (playing the teen's biker mother) greatest film role, imho.

dg (domain=ccwebster)
Are you questioning whether I have correctly represented the standard American practice or whether the standard American practice deserves to ... (When writing in French or Esperanto, I follow a practice which is similar to that of the British When in Rome..)

I haven't had the time yet to look it up for myself, but I question whether it's standard practice. It certainly is in a case such as: Rhett said, "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn." But not in something like: When Rhett said "Frankly, my dear", I knew what was coming next.
In the former, the period is part of the complete sentence being quoted.
In the latter, the comma functions to set off the following clause, not as part of the quote.

dg (domain=ccwebster)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I haven't had the time yet to look it up for myself, but I question whether it's standard practice. It ... being quoted. In the latter, the comma functions to set off the following clause, not as part of the quote.

It doesn't matter what the function of the period or comma is - it always goes inside the quotes. It's done for esthetics - the period or comma just looks better next to some letters. There's probably also some reason pertaining to typesetting machines but I don't know for sure.
Question marks, exclamation points, colons, etc. follow the standard you prefer. Take consolation in that. :-) In situations where it could be confusing (such as technical writing where the period or comma might be part of a command you type to a computer), it's usually easy to recast the sentence to remove the ambiguity.

To verify it, open any book of fiction. In just about any dialogue you will find things like this:
"Frankly, my dear," said Rhett, "I don't give a damn." or
"Franky, my dear, I don't give a damn," said Rhett.

This is not a Leftpondia-only standard. The Brits do the same thing. I just confirmed it by looking at a British paperback novel.

Bill.

William R Ward (Email Removed) http://bill.wards.net Help save the San Jose Earthquakes - http://www.soccersiliconvalley.com /
Are you questioning whether I have correctly represented the standard ... which is similar to that of the British When in Rome..)

I haven't had the time yet to look it up for myself, but I question whether it's standard practice. It ... being quoted. In the latter, the comma functions to set off the following clause, not as part of the quote.

I see from a reply you made to Donna that you are from the Northwest That's Northwest as in the Pacific Northwest of the US, yes? (I'm living in the "upper Northwest," myself.) I have to wonder how you ever got through school without knowing the rules. None of my teachers would ever have allowed me to get by with a sentence such as "Last night I watched 'Mask', a great film."

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
(to Don "Ah!" Groves)
I see from a reply you made to Donna that you are from the Northwest That's Northwest as in the Pacific Northwest of the US, yes?

BTW, no one calls it the "Pacific Northwest" out there. They just call it "the Northwest", perhaps to be inclusive of those vast portions of it that are more than a few hundred miles as the crow flies from the Pacific.

It occurs to me that no one outside of the (Pacific) Northwest calls that region "the Northwest". It's the "Pacific Northwest". I wonder whether the insistence on "Pacific" is some residual effect of the older usage of "the Northwest", something which the residents of the Pacific Northwest would be free to conveniently forget about.
I have had some experience of residing in the Northwest, and I can tell you that the "Pacific" thing is really a misnomer. There's hardly any consciousness among the populace of any proximity to the Pacific Ocean except, presumably, in those small subsets of the Northwest that are actually adjacent to the coast. By contrast, on the East Coast proximity to the Atlantic is a culturally-defining feature of the greatest significance.
(I'm living in the "upper Northwest," myself.)

The "Old Northwest", I'd call it. Certainly Washington state extends further northward than Mpls (ya?).

Steny '08!
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I haven't had the time yet to look it up for myself,

The amount of time it would have taken you is much less than you have wasted on this thread.
but I question whether it's standard practice.

You can question all you want, but the standard practice is, as the Harbace College Handbook has it,
"In using marks of punctuation with quoted words, phrase, or sentences, follow the arbitrary printers' rules by placing:
"(1) The period and the comma always within the quotation marks."
It certainly is in a case such as: Rhett said, "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn." But not in something like: When Rhett said "Frankly, my dear", I knew what was coming next.

Of course you don't find it in something like your text after the colon, because that text is incorrectly punctuated according to standard American practice. It should have been: When Rhett said "Frankly, my dear," I knew what was coming next.
In the former, the period is part of the complete sentence being quoted. In the latter, the comma functions to set off the following clause, not as part of the quote.

You are wrong. Period. That you might not follow the standard practice does not give you licence to decree that long-established standard practice is not standard practice. Spend a little of the copious time you spend with your computer to look up what you should have learned before you were twelve.
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