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Hi,

Please tell me if these sentences are correct:

I'd also like for you to bring all my documents from the file case in my room.

I'd also like for you to bring all my documents in the file case from my room.
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PreciousJones I'd also like for you to bring all my documents from the file case in my room.

I'd also like for you to bring all my documents in the file case from my room. The "for" is correct but unnecessary in both sentences.

The first sentence is unquestionably correct.

In the second sentence, the use of "from" is a bit awkward, but I often hear it used this way. Others may not accept it.

"From the file case" in the first sentence is adverbial: to bring from the file case.

"From my room" in the second sentence is adjectival, qualifying "case" : the case from my room.

It's a gray area. You can be "from" somewhere and still be there.
Granted, we usually think of something as "coming from," "taken from," "removed from," "sent from," etc., in order to BE from. But I don't think it's absolutely necessary.

All my documents [which are] in the file case

Comments  
Please, anyone?

Thank you.
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This use of the word "for" was discussed in another thread, I believe, so I won't go into that again.

The first sentence seems more natural to me. I can't quite get my head round whether the second is trying to say something very slightly different, or, if not, why anyone would arrange the words that way round. At first I thought there might be some difference related to whether the file case itself should be brought, but now I'm not so sure.
 Avangi's reply was promoted to an answer.