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I tried hard to run away from it barking and chasing after me.

Q1) Is the sentence above correct English?
Q2) Is "barking and chasing after me" describing "it" ?
Q3) Even if there is a comma as in "...from it, barking..", is "barking and chasing after me" still describing "it" ?

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fire1I tried hard to run away from it barking and chasing after me.
Q1) Is the sentence above correct English?

It's borderline correct. It's a little crudely constructed, but I suppose we might say it's not horribly incorrect. There may be speakers who actually speak like that, but I wouldn't say it's standard English.

fire1Q2) Is "barking and chasing after me" describing "it"?

Yes. It's certainly how I'd take it if it were 'the dog':

I tried hard to run away from the dog barking and chasing after me.

But we usually say enough about a thing first so that 'it' is fully known by the time we use it. That way we don't need to describe 'it' when we use that word.

You have a reduced relative clause here (which was barking and chasing ...), and those are so rarely used after a pronoun (e.g., 'it') that it sounds wrong to a native speaker's ear. We expect 'it' to refer fully to something. The presence of a defining relative clause with 'it' is therefore anomalous.

fire1Q3) Even if there is a comma as in "...from it, barking..", is "barking and chasing after me" still describing "it"?

Yes. Comma or not, it's the same idea either way.

CJ

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I tried hard to run away from it barking and chasing after me.


From a grammatical point of view, the underlined element could be an NP with the gerund-participial clause "barking and chasing ..." modifying "it", or a gerund-participial clause with "it" as subject and "barking and chasing ..." as predicate.

However, neither version sounds wholly felicitous, probably because of this grammatical ambiguity.

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Comments  
CalifJimCalifJim

You always give great answers. It's like you're catching exactly what I'm curious about as an English learner.

The number of the answers you posted doesn't lie. It's such a luck for me to get great answers from you and some users here for free. I personally teach forigners Korean for free like you volunteer here, and feel it is such a tough work to make them understand with my answers.

Thank you very much as always.

So, to sum up, the best sentence most native Enlglish speakers would be happy to say/write is that "I tried to run away from it because it was barking and chasing after me" ?

Thanks for your note of appreciation.

fire1So, to sum up, the best sentence most native English speakers would be happy to say/write is that "I tried to run away from it because it was barking and chasing after me" ?

Yes. I think that sums it up well. Emotion: yes

CJ

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 BillJ's reply was promoted to an answer.