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Hi

Are both correct:

From Monday I work in another school.
Since Monday I work in another school.


Can I use "from" and "since" in the same way in this case?
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Neither is correct.
Since Monday, I have worked in another school. (Since refers to a point of time in the past, so the verb must be past.)
From is the start of a time period. The end of the period has to be in the phrase. The verb has to agree with the time period.

From next Monday on, I will work in another school. ( "on" means indefinite extent of time, future tense)
From Monday to Wednesday, I work in another school (present, implies an indefinite, regular schedule)
From last Monday until today, I worked in another school. (the time period is a time completed, in the past.)
I have not heard "from" used for a time period that started in the past, and is incomplete in the present.
" From last Monday on" - incorrect. Use "Since" to start the phrase.
AlpheccaStars Neither is correct.

Since Monday, I have worked in another school. (Since refers to a point of time in the past, so the verb must be past.)

Hi

Why did you use the present perfect tense? Is it because you still work there?

Can I also say: I've broken my leg on Monday.
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Yes. "Since" implies that the time period is not completed. "Have worked" means that I am still working at the other school.
In your second sentence, the simple past is better, since the action of breaking is completed and at a particular time.
I broke my leg on Monday.
The present perfect is used in cases such as this one:
I like to ski, but I am reckless and always go too fast. I have broken my leg many times.
AlpheccaStarsIn your second sentence, the simple past is better, since the action of breaking is completed and at a particular time.

I broke my leg on Monday.

Yes, but it's still broken.

Thanks
Yes, it is still broken, but it is not still breaking. The breaking action is completed (unless there is something very strange going on Emotion: smile).
I broke my leg on Monday and the doctor put a cast on it. It is still broken, and the healing.process will take six weeks.
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OK, it's a bit clearer now. Thanks.
Newguest I've broken my leg on Monday.
No! You can't use the present perfect in the same sentence with an action explicitly placed at a definite time -- on Monday in this case.
(But you can mention a definite time that the action began in a since clause.
I have been living here since 1985. )

CJ
NewguestFrom Monday I work in another school.
Since Monday I work in another school.


Can I use "from" and "since" in the same way in this case?
You don't want from.
If the Monday is in the past, then you want

I have been working at another school since Monday.
If the Monday is in the future, then you want
I will be working at another school starting on Monday.
CJ
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