+0
You should try to eat a lot of fruit and vegetables

I don't know why 'fruit' without s but s with 'vegetable.'

Is that because one fruit and many vegetables?
1 2
Comments  
moon7296You should try to eat a lot of fruit and vegetables

I don't know why 'fruit' without s but s with 'vegetable.'

Is that because one fruit and many vegetables?
It's because fruit is generally used as a non-count noun, and vegetable is a count noun.

This carrot is a vegetable.
This pear is a piece of fruit.

They sell vegetables in the market: beans, corn, peas, potatoes, celery and onions.
They sell fruit in the market, too: oranges, apples, peaches, pears, and strawberries.
Hi,

For some reason, we seem to get a lot of questions about the word 'fruits'. Emotion: geeked

In my experience, the word is not used very often by native speakers.

Clive
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
CliveIn my experience, the word is not used very often by native speakers.
And it has a slang meaning that shouldn't be used in polite company.
Hi,

But so does the singular.

Clive
CliveHi,But so does the singular. Clive
Emotion: embarrassed
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thank you for the answer..

English is really complex when it comes to non/counterble nouns.

According to my dictionary, fruit is either counterble or noncounterble; Words belong to it confuse me a lot ㅜ.ㅜ <= I think this is non-native speakers difficulty ㅜ.ㅜ.

Anyway, I have found some meanings of it when used as a slang..

Then do you usually say the name of the fruit direct? In your example, I don't think there's no word other than fruit: "we sell fruit too": oranges, graphs.....

One more question is .. what does "so does the singular" mean by Clive *.*??
Hi,

Why don't you try to write a few sentences, and then we can check them for you?

(The word also has some slang meanings that are not at all important to this discussion.)
Clive
Yes, the uncountable nouns are complicated and need a lot of practice, especially when the word can be in either class, such as fruit.

If you are talking in general about those things that you are going to eat directly, it is frequently used as a noncount noun. I have seen the plural form used, though.

We always have fruit for breakfast. Fruit here implies that you can have a whole fruit, or different pieces of fruit cut up and mixed together. It is a mass noun. Here are more examples:

I buy fruit for the family almost every day so that it will be fresh.
Fruit spoils quickly.

Fruit is countable when it refers to something that we do not eat:

- something that is a product of our work:

We were just now starting to see the fruits of our efforts.
- the plants or species (either count or noncount is OK):
They grow many varieties of fruit/fruits in southern Spain.
California wines are infused with the subtle flavors of fruits, vegetables and spices.
- ones eaten by animals:
The bright orange fruits of the mountain ash tree add beauty to your yard and provide food for birds in late fall and early winter.
You can make jam from prickly pear fruits.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more