O'Neill's masterpiece "Mourning Becomes Electra," was translated by a Mexican columnist into Spanish as "Morning becomes electric."

The French milliard was erroneously translated in the USA as billion and it got stuck in usage. We still have to live with the error of a few millions off.
The word cashew comes from Brazilian Portuguese caju (kah - zhoo), a deformation of the Portuguese (ana)cardio; it is not an Indian word as some enthusiastic scholars of Tupi claimed. The Anacardium (with the heart or core out) gets its name because the "nut" is actually the seed that grows on the outside of the very little know fruit in the States. Anyone who has never seen this fruit before can take a peek at:

http://www.rain-tree.com/Plant-Images/Anacardium occidentale p3.jpg

The word HEART has a very interesting history. The closest original was cardiá in Greek (now used often in medical words as cardio-). The end was chopped through the years by Northern people to card, from there it is easy to guess how the word heart came from, also Herz (German)

Now the Latin path was more complicated. From card, you got cor for Latin, cuore for Italian, and c¦ur for French (later on British took the word again from the French as core to call the heart of fruits). Now when it came to emotionally overloaded Spaniards, they added the augmentative suffix to the word cor and make it a corazón, which actuallyh means a big heart. Portuguese copied it as coração.

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The word HEART has a very interesting history. The closest original was cardi=E1 in Greek (now used often in medical ... Northern people to card, from there it is easy to guess how the word heart came from, also Herz (German)

This is dead wrong, though it reflects a glimmer of understanding (NTTAWWT). "Heart" and its Latin and Greek cognates have a common Proto-Indo-European root, *kerd-. See:
http://www.bartleby.com/61/roots/IE225.html
(Also, interestingly, the same root may be the partial source of "credo" (*[email protected] "to place trust", lit. to do heart).)
O'Neill's masterpiece "Mourning Becomes Electra," was translated by a Mexican columnist into Spanish as "Morning becomes electric."

You got a date on this, name, source, something? It's a fairly common pun.
The French milliard was erroneously translated in the USA as billion and it got stuck in usage. We still have to live with the error of a few millions off.

Not at all. Where'd you get this stuff from?
Dictionnaire de L'Académie française, 4th Edition (1762) BILLION. s.m. Terme d'Arithmétique. Mille millions.

Dictionnaire de L'Académie française, 1st Edition (1694) Million. s. m. Dix fois cent mille.
Dictionnaire de L'Académie française, 1st Edition (1694) MILLE. adj. numeral de tout genre. Dix fois cent.
That is, going the other way,
French
Mille = 10 x 100 = 1000
Million = 10 x 100,000 = 1,000,000
Billion = 1000 x 1,000,000 = 1,000,000,000
The United States used the same system as the French.

As I understand it, it was the British who went a different way for a couple of centuries, for whatever reason (and probably not a translating error, either).
(snip more dubious stuff)

Onward and upward Donna Richoux
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O'Neill's masterpiece "Mourning Becomes Electra," was translated by a Mexican columnist into Spanish as "Morning becomes electric."

That doesn't look Spanish to me. Then again, I don't know Spanish.

Michael Hamm Since mid-September of 2003, AM, Math, Wash. U. St. Louis I've been erasing too much UBE. (Email Removed) Of a reply, then, if you have been cheated, http://math.wustl.edu/~msh210/ Likely your mail's by mistake been deleted.
A version I've read somewhere is that the Americans adopted the system the French were using at the time of the adoption, defining "billion" to be "thousand million", then the French changed to "billion" meaning "million million", leaving America to be the odd man out.
Mark Israel's AUE FAQ, at
http://www.english-usage.com/faq.html#fxbill00 , bears that version out to some extent, saying of "billion"
Early in the 18th century, French arithmeticians
revised its meaning to 10^9, and the U.S., acquiring the word directly from the French, took this meaning also.
The version is further borne out by the Oxford Hachette French Dictionary , which says French "billion" is equivalent to "billion GB, trillion US". That equivalence shows that the lexicographer was apparently unaware of the ambivalence now existing in the UK with regard to the meaning of the word "billion". The aforementioned FAQ article says
Throughout the U.K., a common response to the
question "What do you understand by 'a billion'?"
would be: "Well, I mean a million million, but I
often don't know what other people mean."
As I understand it, it was the British who went a different way for a couple of centuries, for whatever reason (and probably not a translating error, either).

The FAQ article says
The first use (of the word "billion") in England
recorded in the OED is by Locke in 1690: the
quotation clearly shows that for Locke it meant
10^12. This remained the standard British meaning until the middle of the 20th century.
Michael Quinion has an excellent discussion of "billion" and its relatives in an article entitled "A ZILLION TROUBLES That's about the size of it", at
http://www.worldwidewords.org/articles/numbers.htm . `

Bob Cunningham, Southern California, USofA
The early worm shoulda stood in bed.
Woody Wordpecker
O'Neill's masterpiece "Mourning Becomes Electra," was translated by a Mexican columnist into Spanish as "Morning becomes electric."

That doesn't look Spanish to me. Then again, I don't know Spanish.

Nor me, because (1) to mistranslate it that way would be something like La mañana se vuelve eléctrica, which is a bit of a stretch, and (2) Spanish speakers unlike English speakers seldom skip-read vowels, so any Mexican journalist with even the most rudimentary knowledge of English (and I suspect most of them actually have a bit more than that) would see that "u" before the "r" and suspect something funny was probably going on.
File under "probable UL".

Ross Howard
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Nor me

No, I don't know you either.
because (1) to mistranslate it that way would be something like La mañana se vuelve eléctrica, which is a bit of a stretch, and (2) Spanish speakers unlike English speakers seldom skip-read vowels

Actually, all I meant was that "Morning becomes electric" looks like English.
Michael Hamm Since mid-September of 2003, AM, Math, Wash. U. St. Louis I've been erasing too much UBE. (Email Removed) Of a reply, then, if you have been cheated, http://math.wustl.edu/~msh210/ Likely your mail's by mistake been deleted.
Donna Richoux filted:
O'Neill's masterpiece "Mourning Becomes Electra," was translated by a Mexican columnist into Spanish as "Morning becomes electric."

You got a date on this, name, source, something? It's a fairly common pun.

Used in the early 1960s by humorist (1) Alan King as the title of a chapter in his book "Help! I'm A Prisoner In A Chinese Bakery"...the chapter describes the flurry of activity around breakfast in a typical suburban home..r

(1) term selected rather than "comedian" because he's more aligned with Will Rogers than with his contemporaries of the Jacky-Shecky-Buddy stripe.
Once upon a 12/9/03 10:34 AM, in the land of
O'Neill's masterpiece "Mourning Becomes Electra," was translated by a Mexican columnist into Spanish as "Morning becomes electric."

You got a date on this, name, source, something? It's a fairly common pun.

Yes, check out this variation:
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