+0

1. At least three of the seven lawyers the National Republican Senatorial Committee hired to help Mr. Miller were to have left by Saturday.

2. At least three of the seven lawyers the National Republican Senatorial Committee hired to help Mr. Miller were to leave by Saturday.

The time when the author wrote the article was Friday. So "were to" means they already prepared to leave.

My question is: What is the difference between the two? and
In what circumstances 1 is necessary?

Thanks

D
+0
Hi,

1. At least three of the seven lawyers the National Republican Senatorial Committee hired to help Mr. Miller were to have left by Saturday.

2. At least three of the seven lawyers the National Republican Senatorial Committee hired to help Mr. Miller were to leave by Saturday.

The time when the author wrote the article was Friday. So "were to" means they already prepared to leave.

My question is: What is the difference between the two? and

In what circumstances 1 is necessary?

There's often no real difference intended, as seems to be the case in your two examples.

If you consider subtleties, which we often don't, version 1 sounds like they should have left before Saturday. That way, on Saturday they would be 'in a state of having left'.

On the other hand, Version 2 sounds like they could leave before or on Saturday.

Clive

Clive