+1
"They will have been talking for over an hour by the time Thomas arrives"

Whenever you decide to use this tense, must you always include a duration that indicates how long something has been happening up to another point in time? Or is it possible to leave it out?

Thank you
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Hi,

It's usually included, but not always. Do you know about these usages?

eg explaining a future physical or mental state When you arrive, I'll need a shower. I'll have been working hard in the garden.

eg logical deduction / speculation Look at all the bags she is carrying. She'll have been shopping.

Clive
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No, I don't. Thanks though
Hi Clive.

I think for the logical deduction future continuous can be used.

Ex. She will be shopping.

Am I right?

Thanks
Hi,

Yes, that's OK in a context like 'What will she be doing tomorrow afternoon?

But in my example, the shopping was finished. She was seen while on her way home with the bags.

Clive
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