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I'll try to explain in detail my question.

We all know that the classical example of two conditional actions happening in the future would be
1) If the weather is good we will go to the sea.

Here we can see that one action provokes another one to happen. Let me call the first one a trigger and the second one the result.

The pattern here is - A trigger occurs before the result.

Now-------- Trigger -------- Result ------------- Future

2) What if a trigger occurs after the result.

Now-------- Result -------- Trigger ------------- Future

If you call her (the trigger) the day after tomorrow, I will call you tomorrow (the result).

Would it be ok to say in this case?

I will call you tomorrow if you will call her the day after tomorrow. (F+F)
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As far as I know two FUTURES are possible. Is it the case?
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Yes, two futures are possible. However, the present tense form (used as future) is more colloquial:
I will call you tomorrow if you will call her the day after tomorrow.
(F+F)

The form with two future tense forms is more emphatic, and implies asking for a promise.
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TicceIf it helps you out I will do it. (Here we can see, that "I" am not going to do anything before I find out that something has helped you out.)
Not necessarily. This sentence can be taken as synonymous with the one below.
TicceIf it will help you out I will do it. (Here I feel another meaning. I see it as if I am going to do something befor anything else happens, and only after I do it I will see that my doing will help youout.)
If you split hairs, you can see that there may be a difference between the two sentences, but most people, hearing one or the other in an ordinary conversation, will find them the same in meaning -- and it's not that I'm not going to do anything before I find out that it has helped you. A third sentence also has the same meaning.

If you think it will help you, I'll do it.

By the way, in this one, you cannot start: If you will think it will help ....

CJ
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Comments  
1) Is there the case when two futures are a must?
2) Would it be idiomatic to usa two futures in my example all in all?
Hi Ticce;

1) Is there the case when two futures are a must? I can't think of an example. Perhaps in legal language - where "shall" and "will" have specific meanings.

2) Would it be idiomatic to usa two futures in my example all in all?
It's OK, but the more frequent usage (in the US) is as in my last post.

Regards,
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May I share a bit on the issue. I have been thinking about it and have come to see that there might be a difference between both of them

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If we use indicators of time then there is no difference.

I will call you tomorrow if you call her the day after tomorrow.
I will call you tomorrow if you will call her the day after tomorrow.
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However, if we don't use them (indictors of time) then we get a different picture here.

If it helps you out I will do it. (Here we can see, that "I" am not going to do anything before I find out that something has helped you out.)

If it will help you out I will do it. (Here I feel another meaning. I see it as if I am going to do something befor anything else happens, and only after I do it I will see that my doing will help youout.)

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I hope what I wrote can be understood by others.

It seems to me that in case we don't have the indicators of time the specific combination of tenses can make a substantial diffirence.
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.