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I'll attend the funeral.
I'll be attending the funeral.
I'm going to attend the funeral.


What's the difference in meaning between these 3 examples?
Thank you in advance.
Comments  
Hi,

I'll attend the funeral.

I'll be attending the funeral.
I'm going to attend the funeral.


What's the difference in meaning between these 3 examples?

Very broadly speaking, the meaning is the same. However, here are a few comments.

Which version you choose depends quite a bit ion the context you are speaking in.

I'll attend the funeral.

Sounds like an agreement,

or a very definite assertion.

eg He was my brother. Of course I'll attend the funeral.

I'll be attending the funeral.

Sounds more casual.

Can also suggest there is some other concurrent activity being discussed.

eg I can't come to the party tomorrow. My brother died, and I'll be attending the funeral.

I'm going to attend the funeral.

Sounds like you have made a plan.

eg My brother in Australia died. I bought a plane ticket an hour ago. I'm going to attend the funeral.

Clive
kane159What's the difference in meaning between these 3 examples?
The difference is more or less the context you use them in.

-- What will you do when your cousin George dies?
-- That won't be for years, but I'll attend the funeral, of course. [This is almost hypothetical.]

-- Can you meet us tomorrow for pizza at 3 o'clock?
-- No, I can't. My cousin died, and I'll be attending the funeral then. [This is descriptive of future activity during some period of time.]

-- Have you decided yet whether to attend your cousin's funeral?

-- Yes. It's really an inconvenience for someone I hardly knew, but I've thought it over, and I'm definitely going to attend the funeral. [This is a planned action based on a decision.]

CJ

Edit: Without realizing it, I used almost the same example for "be attending" as Clive did!
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Thanks both of you!

By the way,could I use the present perfect instead of going to?
Hi,



You mean 'I have gone to attend the funeral'?

This does not have the future-related meaning of plan/intention.

This means that you are not here right now, because at some point in the past you physically went to the place of the funeral.



Clive
Sorry,I meant the present continuousEmotion: wink how about using it instead of going to?
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Hi,

Please write a sample sentence of the kind you are asking about.

Clive
I am attending the funeral.Emotion: wink
Hi,

I am attending the funeral. This can, of course. mean that you are there right now.

But as a future-related expression, it typically refers to events for which preliminary arrangements have been made.

That's why we can say eg My plane is leaving at 3 pm. Look, here's my ticket.

eg I am attending the funeral. I already told my boss I would take tomorrow off.

Such events are often in the near future, although not necessarilty,

eg I am visiting my brother in China next year. He has a house in Shanghai.

Clive
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