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"Well, I know for sure that I'll stay here until the end of the term; after that date I don't really know what's going to happen."

This sentence sound right to me, but in theory shouldn't I say:

"Well, I know for sure that I'm staying here until the end of the term; after that date I don't really know what will happen."

For non native speakers, future tenses may seem very tricky.

Thanks
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tarirotari... but in theory shouldn't I say:
... I don't really know what will happen."
No, that's not necessary. The idiom is going to (happen) substitutes for will (happen). You can use one or the other. Both are correct.

CJ
tarirotariFor non native speakers, future tenses may seem very tricky.
I think that's because grammar books make them sound confusing. I think that in most cases you can actually use whatever kind of future you like: the general meaning will be the same, but the "feeling" might be slightly different.
For example:

I know that I'll stay here... (sounds more like a prediction)

I know that I'm staying here... (sounds more like it's been planned)
I know that I'm going to stay here... (sounds casual / like the prediction is more likely to happen / etc.)

I think each "feeling" can apply better to certain contexts than others, but that doesn't mean the others can never be used...
I'm not a native speaker, by the way. I might be wrong, but if I was wrong, I really wouldn't know how to explain the future tenses in an unambiguous way.
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This is my approach toward your questions.

I am staying here until...- is a present state expressed by the concurring act, "to stay"

I will stay here until... - is a present intent to fufill a future act "to stay"

An alternative will be: I am going stay here until the end of the term, which equates to "I will stay...".
Thank you both,

Your answers have been quite illuminating. Nevertheless, my feeling is that as far as future forms are concerned, intuition works better than grammar books. Grammar rules for future are just like a humble attempt at reducing something far more complex.

Do you feel the same way?

Thanks again
Haha ... Emotion: big smile How true!
tarirotari Grammar rules for future are just like a humble attempt at reducing something far more complex.
I thought I am the only one with this sentiment. I guess learning methods toward learning English differ from person to person. Whatever works best, I guess.
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Both can be used. An action that may happen in the nearest future can be expressed in present continuous tense.