I can't for the life of me figure out the future tense of smite. I realize that it is an irregular verb, smite, smote, smitten, but what form would it take in a future tense? I assumed it would be "smited" (as in, "will be smited"), but I can't find an appropriate reference to that anywhere.

Any suggestions appreciated,
Jon
1 2
I can't for the life of me figure out the future tense of smite. Irealize that it is an irregular ... assumed it would be "smited" (as in, "will be smited"), but I can't find an appropriate reference to that anywhere.

Future tense (active voice): will smite
Future tense (passive voice): will be smitten

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
I can't for the life of me figure out the future tense of smite.

Future: "I will smite you"
I realize that it is an irregular verb, smite, smote, smitten, but what form would it take in a future tense? I assumed it would be "smited" (as in, "will be smited"), but I can't find an appropriate reference to that anywhere.

That is not the simple future.
Future, Passive voice
"You will be smitten."
Future perfet
"I will have smitten you."
Why should you assume that the "-en" form, normal in perfect and passive constructions, should change to something else?
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In our last episode, (Email Removed), the lovely and talented Jon Danniken broadcast on alt.usage.english:
I can't for the life of me figure out the future tense of smite.

Since English doesn't have a real future tense, simply stick "will," "shall," "going to," or some such in front of the present: "will smite." So far as I know, that will work for any verb.
I realize that it is an irregular verb, smite, smote, smitten, but what form would it take in a future tense? I assumed it would be "smited" (as in, "will be smited"), but I can't find an appropriate reference to that anywhere.

Now you are talking about the passive voice. Start by asking yourself what the present passive is. It is "(be) smitten." Yes, that is usually used in connection with love or infatuation, and indeed, this is the only sense and construction of "smite" that has much currency. That is why you did not think of the answer right away. "Smite" in the active voice, meaning more or less "strike down," has not been common recently and is only encountered in Biblical discussions, Elizabethan literature, and jocular attempts at such language.

If the present passive is "(be) smitten," then according to the formula given above, "will be smitten" should be the future tense of passive "smite," and indeed, it is.

Lars Eighner (Email Removed) http://www.io.com/~eighner / War on Terrorism: History a Mystery
"He's busy making history, but doesn't look back at his own, or the world's.. Bush would rather look forward than backward." Newsweek
I can't for the life of me figure out the future tense of smite. Irealize that it is an irregular ... be "smited" (as in, "will be smited"), but I can't find an appropriate reference to that anywhere. Any suggestions appreciated,

"The lesson is: Our God is vengeful! O spiteful one, show me who to smite and they shall be smoten!" Homer Simpson
The past tense, of course, is ***.
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Indeed. Oughta watched "Friends" whence the line "You are *so* the smitten kitten"

John "Prolly in Buffy too" Dean
Oxford
Thanks, Lars, that is exactly why my mind was stumbling on the "will be smitten" part.
If the present passive is "(be) smitten," then according to the formula given above, "will be smitten" should be the future tense of passive "smite," and indeed, it is.

Jon
Thanks, Don.
Jon
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