I find that in some dictionaries (the OED, for instance), "galore" is defined primarily or exclusively as an adverb. (The OED does admit that it can be used as an adjective as well, but wordsmyth.net, on the other hand, does not.) Can anyone give me an example in which "galore" is used as an adverb? Or otherwise explain the designation?

-skipka
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[nq:1]I find that in some dictionaries (the OED, for instance), "galore" is defined primarily or exclusively as an adverb. (The ... not.) Can anyone give me an example in which "galore" is used as an adverb? Or otherwise explain the designation?
In certain African countries diamonds can be found galore (in plenty).

That appears to be a BrE usage. -- Skitt (in SF Bay Area) http://www.geocities.com/opus731/ I speak English well -- I learn it from a book! -- Manuel (Fawlty Towers)
[nq:1]I find that in some dictionaries (the OED, for instance), "galore" is defined primarily or exclusively as an adverb. (The ... Can anyone give me an example in which "galore" is used as an adverb? Or otherwise explain the designation? -skipka
a novel called Whisky Galore about a ship carrying said spirit that was wrecked and its contents spirited (arf) away by local Islanders (who were then in possession of whisky galore) OED suggests it's from Irish go leór or Gaelic gu leòr, leòir to sufficiency

My OED doesn't mention galore as adjective, only noun and adverb.

''I'm Pussy Galore'' I must be dreaming -- John Dean Oxford De-frag to reply
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(17 Jul 2003) in news:(Email Removed) / alt.english.usage:
I find that in some dictionaries (the OED, for instance), "galore" is defined primarily or exclusively as an adverb. (The ... not.) Can anyone give me an example in which "galore" is used as an adverb? Or otherwise explain the designation?

I find this very strange. The two dictionaries I keep on my hard disk give only the adjectival use:

(MW11CD) Main Entry:ga£lore Pronunciation:g*-l*r Function:adjective Etymology:Irish go leor enough Date:1628 : ABUNDANT, PLENTIFUL — used postpositively *bargains galore

(COD10) galore · adj. (postpos.) in abundance: there were prizes galore. – ORIGIN C17: from Ir. go leor, lit. ‘to sufficiency’.

Similarly, AHD4 (http://www.bartleby.com/61 /) yields:

(AHD4) galore SYLLABICATION: ga·lore PRONUNCIATION: g-lôr, -lr ADJECTIVE: In great numbers; in abundance: “with balloons and hot dogs . . . and fireworks galore” (Anne Armstrong). ETYMOLOGY: Irish Gaelic go leór, enough : go, adv. particle + leór, enough (from Old Irish lour, alteration of roar; see wr-o- in Appendix I).

-- Martin Ambuhl Returning soon to the Fourth Largest City in America
[nq:2]I find that in some dictionaries (the OED, for instance), ... is used as an adverb? Or otherwise explain the designation?
In certain African countries diamonds can be found galore (in plenty). That appears to be a BrE usage.

Interesting. Is this usage current? Common? (I'd have probably phrased it, "Some African countries have diamonds galore.")

Extrapolating from your example, I could also imagine: In the rainforest, birds fly galore. But what about: Today I swam galore.

-skipka
[nq:2] In certain African countries diamonds can be found galore (in plenty). That appears to be a BrE usage.
Interesting. Is this usage current? Common? (I'd have probably phrased it, "Some African countries have diamonds galore.") Extrapolating from your example, I could also imagine: In the rainforest, birds fly galore. But what about: Today I swam galore.

I wish I knew. I found the adverb entry for the word in Oxford Paperback Dictionary and Thesaurus, via OneLook.com.

galore /g"l:/ adverb in plenty.

The rest is strictly my own. "Today I swam in plenty" doesn't sound very idiomatic to me, though. The example with the birds seems OK. -- Skitt (in SF Bay Area) http://www.geocities.com/opus731/ I speak English well -- I learn it from a book! -- Manuel (Fawlty Towers)
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[nq:1] (17 Jul 2003) in news:(Email Removed) / alt.english.usage:
I find that in some dictionaries (the OED, for instance), ... is used as an adverb? Or otherwise explain the designation?

I find this very strange. The two dictionaries I keep on my hard disk give only the adjectival use: (MW11CD) ... enough : go, adv. particle + leór, enough (from Old Irish lour, alteration of roar; see wr-o- in Appendix I).

I thought it was strange, too. Especially given that none of the sources I've seen that call it an adverb give sample usages. Not that Skitt's example doesn't sound plausible, mind you, but I am left wondering whether "galore" was ever used as an adverb in the wild.

Compact OED: adj. Paperback Oxford: adv. New Shorter OED: adv. and postpositive adj.

I sense deep confusion in the ranks.

-skipka
[nq:1] a novel called Whisky Galore about a ship carrying said spirit that was wrecked and its contents spirited (arf) away by local Islanders (who were then in possession of whisky galore)
Is there any difference between Whisky Galore and Whisky-a-Go-Go (both indicating a surfeit)?
[nq:2] (17 Jul 2003) in news:(Email Removed) / alt.english.usage: I ... Irish lour, alteration of roar; see wr-o- in Appendix I).
I thought it was strange, too. Especially given that none of the sources I've seen that call it an adverb ... Compact OED: adj. Paperback Oxford: adv. New Shorter OED: adv. and postpositive adj. I sense deep confusion in the ranks.

Despite what these dictionaries say, if you try to replace 'galore' with something else, it's hard to avoid an adverb phrase: a-plenty, in abundance, etc. 'Postpostive adjective' really seems to be stretching the issue, but perhaps they were trying too hard to stick to the word's etymological use.

-- Rob Bannister
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