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I never heard this term before; I suspect that it ... but they all turn unto nonsense before the full stop.

Read them again. With a bit of thought (and the odd bit of repunctuation), all are both grammatical and meaningful (except for No. 5 anyone?

I see. Intriguing.
1. The horse Raced Past The Barn fell. ("raced" sounds like a verb whose subject is "the horse", rather than ... ducks out on weekends ("hunts ducks" is misleading. The sentence means "men who hunt at weekends shirk their other responsibilities.")

That is not colloquial UK English; both Laura and I tried to make that sense out of it but weren't happy with the result.
3. The cotton clothing is usually made of grow(s) in Mississippi. (A typo needs to be fixed there, I think. Anyway, "the cotton clothing" isn't what it appears; it's an elided relative clause: the cotton that clothing is made of )

Ah. So it's not meaningless if you correct the faulty verb.
4. The prime number few (no prime numbers involved there are few of the prime, the number of the prime is a low one)

Who are the prime in this sense? "The prime" number few. There are few of "the prime". I don't know what this means.
No. 6 is not strictly grammatical, but it is quite common in colloquial registers ("who" is elided after "tycoon", making "the tycoon who sold the offshore oil tracts for a lot of money" the subject and "wanted" the verb).

Again, this is just plain wrong to my register.
OK, after reflection I accept numbers 1 and 5 as being susceptible of being spoken with the intonation required to make sense. But all the others are still nonsense, at least in my UK English.

David
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Hello! I would like to know Garden Path Sentence ! What does this term mean? 1. The horse raced past the barn fell. 2. The man who hunts ducks out on weekends.

I'll deal with this one lower down.
3. The cotton clothing is usually made of grow in Mississippi. 4. The prime number few. 5. Fat people eat accumulates.

This would be better as: "The fat people eat accumulates".

David, the Omrud, explained the origin of Garden Path.

This is a Garden Path Sentence because the first words mislead the reader.

Someone reading "The fat people eat ..." would think the sentence to be about "The fat people". The reader would then expect the remainder of the sentence to be something like "too much" or "the wrong sort of food".

In fact, the sentence is not about "fat people". It is about the "fat that people eat". This does not become clear until the complete sentence has been read and understood.
The sentence can be changed by inserting "that":
"The fat that people eat accumulates".
That new version is not a Garden Path Sentence
Now the second example: "The man who hunts ducks out on weekends."

First we need the meaning of "duck out".
From MSN Encarta
http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/features/dictionary/DictionaryResults.aspx?refid=1861698164
duck out
intransitive verb
avoid something: to avoid or dodge doing something "She’s trying to duck out of paying her part of the bill."
The first few words of the sentence mislead a reader into expecting to read something about a duck hunter. In fact the sentence does not say what the man hunts. It simply says that he "ducks out" on weekends. It does not say what he ducks out of. All we know is that he avoids doing something.
6. The tycoon sold the offshore oil tracts for a lot of money wanted to kill JR.

Examples, 1, 3, and 6 do not make sense to me.
Example 4, "The prime number few", makes sense if "The prime" is referring to the best (prime) of some sort of thing, person or animal.

This is another Garden Path Sentence because the reader is misled into thinking it is about a "prime number". In fact "number" id not a noun but a verb.
Is there anyone who explains me this English grammar?

I hope that helps you.

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.u.e)
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Hello! I would like to know Garden Path Sentence ! What does this term mean?

I think others have defined "Garden Path Sentence". I have never heard the term before, but understand that poorly written and incomplete thoughts can result in ideas that mislead or lose a train of thought. In many cases (my corrections are only suggestions as to what the speaker intends) relative pronouns have been left out. In others, dependent clause verbs get confused with the independent clauses.
1. The horse raced past the barn fell.The horse ('1' that raced past the barn) fell.

The horse fell. (Which horse? dependent clause, which modifies horse) the one that raced past the barn.)
2. The man who hunts ducks out on weekends.The man who hunts ducks out on weekends (intonation with a pause ... (or, "The prime (the best) number (are counted as) few. 5. Fat people eat accumulates.The fat (that) people eat accumulates.

But we might say "Music people make pleases". "Noise people make irritates".
So, "Fat people eat accumulates" can be accepted in this pattern.
6. The tycoon sold the offshore oil tracts for a lot of money wanted tokill JR.The tycoon (who/that sold the ... JR. Is there anyone who explains me this English grammar?Is there anyone (who can explain to me this English grammar?)

As you can see, you have also combined a dependent clause (beginning with who") with an independent clause.
As isolated sentences, the samples you provided appear meaningless. However, in actual spoken conversation, at least in the US, many lesser words are slurred over or dropped completely.
"The man ran the house died" Or: "The man run the house died."

Pat
durkinpa at msn.com
Wisconsin
Now the second example: "The man who hunts ducks out on weekends." First we need the meaning of "duck out". ... on weekends. It does not say what he ducks out of. All we know is that he avoids doing something.

Accepting "on weekends" as US English, I can't take "ducks out" without any context. It seems to insist on knowing from what this man is ducking out.
"The man who hunts ducks out at the weekend" is the UK version, but it's not a complete sentence to me.
Talking of ducks, I'm sorry to report that every time Count Dooku was mentioned in Episode III, I thought of Count Duckula.

David
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And "few" could be the past participle of "to fy". Fly

> Flew;Fy

> Few. The Ogre might fy, so in the past it few. But I don't entirely see how a prime number could fy.

I think we could make a spirited case for few being a prime number, though. I certainly can't find a divisor for it.

Mike.
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Now the second example: "The man who hunts ducks out ... of. All we know is that he avoids doing something.

Accepting "on weekends" as US English, I can't take "ducks out" without any context. It seems to insist on knowing from what this man is ducking out.

Yes, but strictly, you don't have to fully understand the sentence and know what everything is referring to, for it to be a legitimate sentence. You know that "He never does" is a good sentence, even if you don't know who "he" is, and what it is that that he never "does."

You have to supply a backstory for some of these. For example, "Every soldier here ducks out of guard duty sometimes. The man who dances ducks out late at night. The man who hunts ducks out on weekends."

Best Donna Richoux
6. The tycoon sold the offshore oil tracts for a lot of money wanted to kill JR.

Examples, 1, 3, and 6 do not make sense to me.

Maybe a pair of commas could help:
6. The tycoon, sold the offshore oil tracts for a lot of money, wantedto kill JR.

Javi
Examples, 1, 3, and 6 do not make sense to me.

Maybe a pair of commas could help: 6. The tycoon, sold the offshore oil tracts for a lot of money, wanted to kill JR.

The commas can be used, of course, but their use absolutely requires the "who" to introduce the dependent clause. Commas are not required if the "who" is present, however.
The tycoon, who sold the offshore oil tracts for a lot of money, wanted to kill JR.
(dep. clause modifies tycoon, implying that only one tycoon existed who wanted to kill JR.)
The tycoon who sold the offshore oil tracts for a lot of money wanted to kill JR.
(dep. clause modifies tycoon, implying that of a number of tycoons, the one who sold the offshore oil tracts is the one who wanted to kill JR.)
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kill

Maybe a pair of commas could help: 6. The tycoon, sold the offshore oil tracts for a lot of money, wanted to kill JR.

The commas can be used, of course, but their use absolutely requires the "who" to introduce the dependent clause. Commas ... of tycoons, the one who sold the offshore oil tracts is the one who wanted to kill JR.)

I meant the past participle "sold" as in "having sold":
6. The tycoon,(having) sold the offshore oil tracts for a lot of money,wanted to kill JR.

Javi
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