Hello!
I would like to know Garden Path Sentence !
What does this term mean?
1. The horse raced past the barn fell.
2. The man who hunts ducks out on weekends.
3. The cotton clothing is usually made of grow in Mississippi.
4. The prime number few.
5. Fat people eat accumulates.
6. The tycoon sold the offshore oil tracts for a lot of money wanted to killJR.
Is there anyone who explains me this English grammar?

Thank you.
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Hello! I would like to know Garden Path Sentence ! What does this term mean? 1. The horse raced past ... oil tracts for a lot of money wanted to kill JR. Is there anyone who explains me this English grammar?

I never heard this term before; I suspect that it is used in English Foreign Language teaching. I see from searching that it's related to "leading somebody up the garden path". That is, to start somebody on a track which will turn out to be a false one.
All these "sentences" are meaningless. They start out well but they all turn unto nonsense before the full stop.

David
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Hello! I would like to know Garden Path Sentence ! ... JR. Is there anyone who explains me this English grammar?

I never heard this term before; I suspect that it is used in English Foreign Language teaching. I see from ... one. All these "sentences" are meaningless. They start out well but they all turn unto nonsense before the full stop.

Do they? Reading the first one, I wondered if a "barn fell" might be some geographical feature that I've never heard of. And it seems perfectly possible to me that the man who hunts might duck out of something at weekends, but I'm not sure what.

Laura
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I never heard this term before; I suspect that it ... but they all turn unto nonsense before the full stop.

Do they? Reading the first one, I wondered if a "barn fell" might be some geographical feature that I've never ... possible to me that the man who hunts might duck out of something at weekends, but I'm not sure what.

You're right, of course, and I started trying to make sense of them in this sort of manner. But then I looked up "garden path sentence" and all became as clear as mud.
I was wondering if "accumulates" are like "aggregates" but made of food rather than of rock. Fat people might like them.

And "few" could be the past participle of "to fy". Fly

> Flew; Fy

> Few. The Ogre might fy, so in the past it few. But I don't entirely see how a prime number could fy.

David
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Hello! I would like to know Garden Path Sentence ! ... JR. Is there anyone who explains me this English grammar?

I never heard this term before; I suspect that it is used in English Foreign Language teaching. I see from ... one. All these "sentences" are meaningless. They start out well but they all turn unto nonsense before the full stop.

Read them again. With a bit of thought (and the odd bit of repunctuation), all are both grammatical and meaningful (except for No. 5 anyone?
1. The horse Raced Past The Barn fell.("raced" sounds like a verb whose subject is "the horse", rather than what it really is: the first part of the horse's name)
2. The man who hunts ducks out on weekends("hunts ducks" is misleading. The sentence means "men who hunt at weekends shirk their other responsibilities.")
3. The cotton clothing is usually made of grow(s) in Mississippi.(A typo needs to be fixed there, I think. Anyway, "the cotton clothing" isn't what it appears; it's an elided relative clause: the cotton that clothing is made of )
4. The prime number few(no prime numbers involved there are few of the prime, the number of the prime is a low one)
No. 6 is not strictly grammatical, but it is quite common in colloquial registers ("who" is elided after "tycoon", making "the tycoon who sold the offshore oil tracts for a lot of money" the subject and "wanted" the verb).

Ross Howard
I would like to know Garden Path Sentence ! What does this term mean?

I haven't heard it before. I suppose it could refer to a sentence that leads you astray down the garden path.
1. The horse raced past the barn fell.The horsse that fell was the one that raced past the barn. 2. ... me. Is there anyone who explains me this English grammar?Would someone please explain to me the grammar of those sentences.

(No question mark because it's not really a question; it's a request.)
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You're right, of course, and I started trying to make sense of them in this sort of manner. But then I looked up "garden path sentence" and all became as clear as mud.

For the curious, here's a snip from a Web page dealing with "garden path sentences":

begin quoted text

Garden path sentences are used in psycholinguistics to illustrate that human beings process language one word at a time. The name comes from the saying "to be led down the garden path" meaning "to be misled".

The classic example is:
"The horse raced past the barn fell."
The reader usually starts to parse this as an ordinary active intransitive sentence, but stumbles upon reaching the word "fell." At this point, the reader is forced to backtrack and look for other structures. It may take some rereading and/or relistening to realize that "raced past the barn" is in fact a reduced relative clause with a passive participle, implying that someone other than the horse raced the horse and that "fell" is the main verb. The correct reading is then:
"The horse (that was raced past the barn (by someone that is not the horse itself)) fell."
This example hinges on the ambiguity of the lexical category of the word "raced": it can be either a past-tense verb or a passive participle. Note that there is no ambiguity for some other verbs, even when the sentence structure is similar:
"The car driven past the barn crashed."

end quoted text

I think the OP may be asking us to do his homework for him.
1. The horse raced past the barn fell.

The horsse that fell was the one that raced past the barn.

I meant to write "that was raced past the barn".
Bob Cunningham filted:

The only one I've seen so far that makes sense in this thread is the one that makes "raced" passive...think of "the horse that was raced past the barn"; he fell..

This one's spoilt, unless someone knows a dialect in which "cotton" is plural..
4. The prime number few.

Beats me. Maybe "prime" is a collective noun like "meek" in "The meek shall inherit the earth", and maybe "number" ... mean, "There are few prime numbers", but that's not true. If I remember right, the number of primes is infinite.

But only a small proportion of the total number of integers...the "Prime Number Theorem" gives an approximation of this proportion..r
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