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With gas and oil prices setting new records on a daily basis, many analysts are beginning to wonder whether anything can stop prices from rising.

I believe gas in the article means gasoline. My question is since gas is a product of oil why does the writer mention gas and oil together? Isn't gas redundant?

Just to make sure I understand oil prices correct, they include cooking oil price, engine oil price, gasoline oil price, etc, right?

Thanks!
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Comments  
Gas here mens gas - NOT gasoline
Gasoline is derived from oil
The author is referring to the price of cruide oil, and gasoline/petrol.

If I said the price of lumber and paper was increasing, would that be redundant?

What about lumber and wooden furniture?
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New2grammarJust to make sure I understand oil prices correct, they include cooking oil price, engine oil price, gasoline oil price, etc, right?
Engine oil, industrial oil, gasoline, (Not sure about Diesel but I think so too)

BUT not cooking oil, which mostly comes from vegetable sources I believe
New2grammarMy question is since gas is a product of oil why does the writer mention gas and oil together? Isn't gas redundant?
Well, maybe, but it's such a common locution I wouldn't stress too much over it.
New2grammarJust to make sure I understand oil prices correct, they include cooking oil price, engine oil price, gasoline oil price, etc, right?
The context of this article makes it clear that the author is referring only to crude oil and its derivatives, mainly gasoline. Certianly not cooking oil and the like.
RayHMy question is since gas is a product of oil why does the writer mention gas and oil together? Isn't gas redundant?
I thought I'd explained above that gas is NOT a product derived from oil - Gasoline is.
So when the writer refers to Gas and Oil prices he is talking about 2 different commodities - so Gas here is not redundant.
Sorry if my earlier post wasn't clear
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I think GG has a point. Though gas (if the author means gasoline) is a derivative of oil/petrolium, it's still not redudandant in this context.

I don't think the price of natural gas is soaring because as far as I know 90 percent of any oil site is filled with natural gas and demand for natural gas is low because of transportation costs and extraction difficulties. So, logically, the writer means gasoline. Just my thought.
Unfortunately the price of Gas is rising, although maybe not as dramatically as Oil.
Everything is rising these days except for my salary.

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