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Hi,

I think there is such a thing as the "genitive of purpose" and a typical example of it is "a girl's school," in which the phrase "girl's school" identifies or tells us that it is a school only girls attend. Can "a girl's shirt" fit in that category too?

(Walks into the store)

John: Hi, I would like to buy a nice girl's shirt for the upcoming my niece's birthday. Do you have something in stock?

Clerk: Sure, I have a nice girl's shirt in that rack. I think it would be a good shirt for you to buy because the style of it is very much in demand now and lots of girls in your niece's age seem to like it.

Then again, how would you know if we are talking about a shirt that belongs to a girl or it is a shirt that is made for girls?
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Hi,

I think there is such a thing as the "genitive of purpose" and a typical example of it is "a girl's school," in which the phrase "girl's school" identifies or tells us that it is a school only girls attend. Can "a girl's shirt" fit in that category too?<< These two examples sound similar to me.

(Walks into the store)

John: Hi, I would like to buy a nice girl's shirt for the upcoming my niece's birthday. Do you have something in stock?

Clerk: Sure, I have a nice girl's shirt in that rack. I think it would be a good shirt for you to buy because the style of it is very much in demand now and lots of girls in your niece's age seem to like it.

Then again, how would you know if we are talking about a shirt that belongs to a girl or it is a shirt that is made for girls? The context would normally make that very clear. When was the last time that you went into a store that sells shirts that belong to individual girls?

Or, consider the likelihood of this scenario.

John walks into a women's store.

Salesclerk: Can I help you?

John: I'd like to buy a girl's shirt.

Salesclerk: Certainly. How about that girl over there? Mary, can you take your shirt off? This gentleman wants to buy it.

Best wishes, Clive Emotion: big smile

( A girl's shirt is commonly called a blouse. )
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BelieverI think there is such a thing as the "genitive of purpose" and a typical example of it is "a girl's school," in which the phrase "girl's school" identifies or tells us that it is a school only girls attend.
Hi Believer

If more than one girl attend the school, the plural genitive must be used: a girls' school. Of course a girl's schoolis right if the school has only one pupil (a girl) or if you are talking about a girl owning a school, but that is a little far-fetched.Emotion: smile

Many people don't know where to place the apostrophe and I have actually seen a girls school without an apostrophe a few times. Right or wrong? That's a matter of opinion.

Cheers
CB