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"There have been ex-presidents who have enriched themselves by dubious means, as the George Bushes and Bill Clinton have by giving high-dollar speeches to plutocrats." (New Republic.)

Why is "George" in singular and "Bushes" in plural in the noun phrase "George Bushes" in the above?
Comments  
AnonymousWhy is "George" in singular and "Bushes" in plural in the noun phrase "George Bushes" in the above?
There are two George Bushes who were presidents: George W Bush and George H W Bush.
Mister Micawber AnonymousWhy is "George" in singular and "Bushes" in plural in the noun phrase "George Bushes" in the above?There are two George Bushes who were presidents: George W Bush and George H W Bush.
Thank you for the reply.

Yes I know it. That interpretation is based on our knowledge of political situation in the USA. But I wonder whether it passes a grammatical test as for a one who doesn't know anything about both Bushes might think that "George Bushes" stay for a man with the family name of "Bushes".
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Anonymous. But I wonder whether it passes a grammatical test
Yes, it does.
Anonymousor a one who doesn't know anything about both Bushes might think that "George Bushes" stay for a man with the family name of "Bushes".
One might, but that is one's ignorance, not a grammar mistake.
We make the whole noun phrase plural, not the parts of the phrase.

sisters-in-law, not *sisters-in-laws

shoe store, not *shoes store

tall trees, not *talls trees

university students, not *universities students

We make the whole name plural once.

You could pluralize "George" if it occurred without the last name: I have four "Georges" on my class roster.
Anonymousone who doesn't know anything about both Bushes might think that "George Bushes" stand for a man with the family name of "Bushes"
Not with the definite article in front.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
fivejedjonNot with the definite article in front.
Indeed, thank you for the explanation.

This is Bush-league English. Where can I get a Major-league answer to the question?

anonymous

This is Bush-league English. Where can I get a Major-league answer to the question?

Emotion: stick out tongue

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