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Hi, all.
Could you please check the following sentences up?
Are they OK?

1) Can we rely on his installing all our equipment correctly?
2) I object to his installing our equipment.
3) The success of our project absolutely depend on her reacting to our proposal.

4) Situation: A candidate is waiting for the result of the first job interview and he speaks:
If I had known that I had passed the interview, I should have begun preparing for the second one.
or
If I had known that I've passed the interview, I should have begun preparing for the second one.

Thanks in advance.
Comments  
Nomad04Hi, all.
Could you please check the following sentences up?
Are they OK?

1) Can we rely on his installing all our equipment correctly?
2) I object to his installing our equipment.
3) The success of our project absolutely depend on her reacting to our proposal.

4) Situation: A candidate is waiting for the result of the first job interview and he speaks:
If I had known that I had passed the interview, I should have begun preparing for the second one.
or
If I had known that I've passed the interview, I should have begun preparing for the second one.

Thanks in advance.

Welcome Nomad,

1) Can we rely on his installing all our equipment correctly? Not quite! How about: Can we rely on him to correctly install our equipment ?

2) I object to his installing our equipment. I object to having him to install our equipment.
3) The success of our project absolutely depend[s] on her reacting to our proposal. The structure looks fine, but not sure if I understand the context.

4) Situation: A candidate is waiting for the result of the first job interview and he speaks:
If I knew had known that I had passed the interview, I would should have begun preparing for the second one.
For # 4, a simple past tense will be sufficient.

Same context: If I had enough money, I would have bought the Ipod for her birthday.

Hope that helps!
Hello, Goodman.
First of all, thank you for your reply.

Part 1 Emotion: smile
The problem is that it's not easy for me to understand where I should use a gerund and where an infinitive in such sentences.
As regards to first two sentences, what's the problem? It sounds unnatural for your native speaker ear, but you understand the sense of the sentences or maybe they're absolutely incorrect?

To check my guesses up, I have three others sentences in such way:

1) I'm looking forward to being sent to the United States on business.
2) I was frightened by his opening the door so suddenly.
3) I don't mind your going there.

Are they alright?

Part 2 Emotion: wink

Why "would", Goodman?
I've always thought I should use "should" for 1st person and use "would" for 2nd and 3rd persons.
But I've also heard that "should" for 1st person had gone from use and I should use "would" for 1st person also.
So I should use "would", shouldn't I?
One more example:
Why didn't you phone me yesterday? I would have helped you.

It's OK?

I'm sorry for my English, I hope you'll understand what I want to say.
Thanks in advance.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
) I'm looking forward to being sent to the on business.
2) I was frightened by his opening the door so suddenly.
3) I don't mind your going there.

Are they alright? – They are fine

Part 2

You wrote:

Why "would", Goodman?
I've always thought I should use "should" for 1st person and use "would" for 2nd and 3rd persons. First, the application of “would” or “should” has nothing to do with 1st or 2nd person. It has to do with the intent and context. In certain context, “would” is used in a conditional situation which has absolutely no relationship with “should” at all. Ex:

You bought a house recently in a new neighborhood and you heard your neighbor’s house was burglarized. You’d probably say “If I had known about the crime rate, I would not have even considered this place”.

You should not have bought this house if you are not willing to live up to the financial obligation.

You wrote:
Why didn't you phone me yesterday? I would have helped you. This is perfect!

I wish I could explain it more easily to understand. I know they are confusing. The only way to really understand the usage is to read more often and listen to native speaking. Grammar rules are hard to memorize and often confusing in different context.
Additionally:

1) Can we rely on his installing all our equipment correctly? ] This is fine; but many native speakers would say "...on him installing all our..."

2) I object to his installing our equipment. ] Again, fine; but many native speakers would say "...to him installing..."

3) The success of our project absolutely depend on her reacting to our proposal.] The gerund here is a little unnatural; you would be more likely to hear "...absolutely depends on her reaction to our proposal".

4) If I had known that I had passed the interview, I should have begun preparing for the second one. ] This is fine; but the use of "should" as the first person form of "would" has become less common than it once was.

5) If I had known that I've passed the interview, I should have begun preparing for the second one.] Here, it's unidiomatic to use the present perfect in the subordinate clause. Change to "I had passed".

MrP
Goodman, MrP thanks for your help.
It's really important for me to know how native speakers perceive my written and spoken English.

One more question:

Is there any difference between first and second sentences?
Which sentence would you prefer to use in real life situation?

Situation: A man, soiled with machine oil, is speaking to his neighbor:
1) I regret having bought the car.
2) I regret that I've bought the car.

By the way, can I use Past Simple in the second sentence? (I regret that I bought the car.)
I think, I can't, but who knows.

P.S. Present Perfect is a really special thing for me Emotion: wink
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Hi Nomad,

1) I regret having bought that stupid car! Ok

2) I regret [ the fact] that I've bought that stupid car. Ok

Or I regret that I bought that stupid car ! acceptable
Nomad04One more question:

Is there any difference between first and second sentences?
Which sentence would you prefer to use in real life situation?

Situation: A man, soiled with machine oil, is speaking to his neighbor:
1) I regret having bought the car.
2) I regret that I've bought the car.

I would say:

1. I wish I hadn't bought the [expletive] thing.

2. I wish I'd never bought...

3. I regret ever having bought...

4. I'm sorry I bought...

5. I regret having bought...

"I regret (the fact) that I bought the car" and "I regret the fact that I've bought this car" are ok, but probably less likely in an oily-rag situation.

MrP
Goodman, MrP thanks.
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