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Hi everyone,

Can a word be a gerund noun and a participle adjective ? For example, if we add to the verb (read)

(ing) it will be (reading) which is a gerund noun and can not be a participle adjective ! Is this right ? Is there some classification, maybe according to if the word transitive or not or something ?

I appreciate your replies.
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AnonymousCan a word be a gerund noun and a participle adjective ?
Not normally simultaneously in the same sentence. No. But in different sentences an -ing word may play different roles. Note these uses of reading:

Reading in the library is a good way to pass the time. [gerund]

Reading that Australians had invaded Cuba, Jorge became upset. [participle]

Has anyone seen my reading glasses? [gerund used as adjective - glasses for reading, not glasses doing reading]
Paul is reading in the library. [participle as part of a verb phrase -- not adjectival]

CJ
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AnonymousCan a word be a gerund noun and a participle adjective ?
While I was idly thinking about this, "testing" came to mind as an example. E.g.:

"We haven't completed our testing." (noun)

"These are testing times." (adjective)
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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thank you very much.
Thank you very much. Nice reply.

Look at this, (melting ice) melting here is adjective according to Longman.

But can I use it as a gerund. For Example, the melting of the ice at the poles.

If this is right, how would Longman say it is adjective !!
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Anonymous
Can a word be a gerund noun and a participle adjective ? For example, if we add to the verb (read)

(ing) it will be (reading) which is a gerund noun and can not be a participle adjective ! Is this right ? Is there some classification, maybe according to if the word transitive or not or something ?

Yes is the simple answer, though not at the same time! The -ing form of many verbs such as read can certainly function as a noun as well as a participial adjective, though there's no 'classification' in the sense that you mean. Gerund and participle are terms from traditional grammar in which 'gerund' is a verb-form that is functionally like that of a noun, and 'participle' is one that is functionally similar to an adjective. The term participle, for example, was used because grammarians wanted to draw attention to the way one word-class could become another (i.e. participate in the function of another). But modern approaches to linguistics don't usually worry about where a word-class came from. The important point is how a word is functioning now. The -ing form of a verb often functions as an adjective, but just because a word is participial in form says nothing about what its syntactic function is. So, if you look at how the word reading is being used in a variety of sentences its function becomes clear:

She likes reading. Here, it's a noun because it's functioning as a noun, specifically the direct object of likes.

I like reading books. Here, it's a verb because it's functioning as a verb. Note that it has books as its direct object.

Reading at the dinner table is considered bad manners. Here, it's also a verb, this time with the adverbial phrase 'at the dinner table' modifying it. Together they form the subject of the sentence.

I need my reading glasses. This time it's an adjective (sometimes called a participial adjective) because it's functioning that way. Specifically, it modifies the noun glasses.

I am reading a good book. Here, it's a verb, but it's combined with the verb 'be' to form the progressive aspect. Note that am reading has a good book as its direct object.

BillJ
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