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"My ice cream being eaten made me angry."

Is being a gerund and the subject of the sentence, or is My ice cream being eaten a participle phrase (controlled by eaten) and constituting the subject of the sentence?
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Comments  
It's got to be the whole phrase (nonfinite clause) as the subject, I think, RVW. (I'm not familiar with 'controlled by' here-- that means that 'eat' is the main verb of the clause?) 'Being' can hardly occur as a noun, outside of 'Being is preferable to non-being', can it?


"My ice cream being eaten made me angry."

"Being" is a participle and not a gerund. The above sentence can be rewritten as, "My ice cream (which was)being eaten made me angry."
"My ice cream(which was) being eaten" is the subject of the verb "made".
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"My ice cream being eaten made me angry."

I think the sentence is wrong anyway. The apostrophe is missing.

"My ice cream's being eaten made me angry."

"The eating of my ice cream made me angry."
Hi Dehbaash again. Hi rvw, Mister Micawber.

Can I say:
#My ice cream being eaten, I got angry.
or
#My ice cream being eaten, there is no ice cream.

And these are "absolute participial constructions," ..right?
........................................
English is a completely foreign language for me. But to tell the truth the first sentence, [My ice cream being eaten made me angry], seemed somewhat strange to me, at first: ice cream is an agent..?
But I got accustomed to it now.
Hi Eimai_Anglos,

I think your second sentence is problematic.

-Somebody ate my ice cream, which made me angry.

-My ice cream was eaten, which made me angry.

- "My ice cream's being eaten made me angry."

all correct to me, but

"The eating of my ice cream made me angry." is some problematic, for "eating" is active. Consider "being eaten"

like

"I don't like people laughing at me = I don't like being laughed at"

anyway, rvw, the phrase in question, "being eaten", is a participle phrase.

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"I don't like people laughing at me = I don't like being laughed at"




a) "I don't like people laughing at me = I don't like being laughed at"

b) "I don't like somebody eating my icecream = I don't like my icecream being eaten by somebody"

c)The eating of my icecream makes me angry = my icecream being eaten makes me angry.






Dehbaash wrote

a) "I don't like people laughing at me = I don't like being laughed at"

b) "I don't like somebody eating my icecream = I don't like my icecream being eaten by somebody"

c)The eating of my icecream makes me angry = my icecream being eaten makes me angry.

.................................................................................................................................................

Yet "c" is still problematic to me;

"the eating ( the act of consuming) of my ice cream" = my ice cream's eating , not "my ice cream being eaten"

ice cream, here, is exposed to the action, "eat", not "a doer.

Rvw"My ice cream being eaten made me angry."

Is being a gerund and the subject of the sentence, or is My ice cream being eaten a participle phrase (controlled by eaten) and constituting the subject of the sentence?

I'd agree that the whole 'my ice cream being eaten' phrase is the subject of the sentence.

It wasn't the ice cream that made you angry, so we can't say that 'being eaten' is acting adjectivally; nor was it the 'being eaten' of the ice cream (which is closer in meaning to 'the ice cream's being eaten'). It was the phenomenon as a whole: my-ice-cream-being-eaten.

The 'being eaten' part of the phrase is the (present passive) participle of 'eat'. It would be a gerund in e.g. 'the being beaten isn't so bad as the being eaten'; which ice creams might say, if they could talk.

MrP
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