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Hi,

I want to ask you one question , whether "Trying" is Gerund or Participle in the sentence below ?

1) The vice president is analyzing the sales data, trying to understand why the company sold less than expected last month.

Is "Trying " in the above sentence a gerund , participle or a verb ?

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It's a present participle and of course also a verb as all participles are verbs.

CB

Comments  

trying to understand... is adverbial, so "trying" is a participle, not a gerund.


However, I would argue that the gerund-participle distinction is not very useful or meaningful. In trying to understand... trying is a verb regardless of the function of the clause it heads. It's simpler just to call it an ·ing form or a gerund-participle, in my opinion.

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 Cool Breeze's reply was promoted to an answer.

Hello sir,

But trying in the above sentence is acting as a verb or gerund ?

ritik

Hello sir,

But trying in the above sentence is acting as a verb or gerund ?

Verb. Adverbials can't be gerunds. Here's a quick overview of verb forms.


............................................. VERBS

... FINITE FORMS ................................ NON-FINITE FORMS

..........TENSES .................................. PARTICIPLES ....... INFINITIVES

(PRESENT, PAST, ETC.) .............. -INGs* . -ENs


*An -ing that occupies the position of a noun phrase in a sentence, e.g., if it is the subject or object in a clause, can be called a gerund-participle or a gerund.

CJ

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