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· I see dringking man - this is not a sentence with complete sense.

Possibilities: I see a man drinking (a soda) where drinking is a present participle of the verb “drink” describing the action.

I see a man who is drinking (a soda) ---drinking is used in it’s present progress form.

I see a man drinking from a drinking fountain -- 1st “drinking” is present participle describing what the man is doing.

The 2nd “drinking” is used as an adjective describing the fountain.

I need the drinking water--- “The” does not work in this context. Perhaps, “I need some drinking water” works better

“Drinking” is an adjective describing what kind of water it is. None of the above sentences containa a gerund.

In the following sentences “drinking” is used as gerunds:

1) Drinking a glass of wine everyday is good to your health; according to a report from NEJM.

2) Drinking and driving is hazardous to your health

3) Drinking two glasses of beer can potentially put you over the legal limit to drive.

Hello CJ

I don't like to argue against a great guru like you, but I agree with Riglos about this issue.

I understand "walking stick" is "stick for the purpose of walking" or "stick to be used in walking". So I take this "walking" as a gerund and I parse "walking stick" as a noun-noun phrase just like "lacrosse stick" is a noun-noun phrase.

paco
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Owing to the fact that there are so few inflections in English, the few inflected forms that there are are used in a number of ways. An ing-form, for example, can be

1. a present participle: a walking man
2. a noun: the beginning as easy
3. an adjective: I was willing to learn it
4. a preposition: I'll contact him concerning his salary
5. a gerund: Seeing is believing
6. a verbal noun: the correct speaking of English is easy
7. an adverb: it was biting cold

And so on. What makes grammatical matters more complicated is the fact that grammarians don't always use the same terms to refer to the same things. For instance, in the above examples, many would call number six (verbal noun) a gerund as well.

In my opinion a gerund is not a noun, nor is it a verb, but a little bit of both. The verbal aspect of the gerund is seen in this sentence, in which a gerund is followed by an object:

Speaking English is easy.

Nouns can't take an object, at least not in traditional grammar, so in my opinion speaking is not a noun in the sentence above. Furthermore, nouns can normally be preceded by adjectival attributes, but slow speaking English is easy would probably be regarded as incorrect by all.

Please don't get me wrong: I don't want to argue or even really disagree with anybody. I just want to make a point.
Well.. as far as the difference between present participle and geruind is concerned, its quite simple. present participles are part adjectives and part verbs while gerunds are part nouns and part varbs.

Present Participle Examples: 1. Moses entered the burning bushes.
(Here burning is used adjectively - bushes that were burning)

2. Moses saw that the bush was burning.
(Here burning is used as a verb)

Gerund Examples: 3. Singing should be taught to every boy at the school.
(Here singing is used as a noun and thus is a gerund.)

An easy way to confront this problem is to see wheather the confusing word ( -ing word )is a verb or not. If its not acting as a verb in the sentence (as it is acting as a verb in sentence 2) then check wheather its modifying any noun or not(as in sentence 1). if it is then its a present participle. If it isn't then it must be a serving as a noun - gerund (as in sentence 3).

The first example that you asked about is a walking stick.
Well it depends upon wheather how common this word "walking stick". To me its an adjective because this word is not so common in our vernacular. But those people to whome this word is common may regard it as a compound word (walking stick - open form of compound words).

As far as the second problem is concerned, its clearly a present Participle since the adjectival quality of the word "speaking" is dominant.

In the third example, "washing machine" is clearly a compound word thus you can call it a gerund.

I hope that would solve your problems.
Fahad
Walking Stick, and Washing Machine are both NOUNS. Call them compound nouns if you want. People used to put hypthen in compund nouns so you would understand that there were in fact one one. So a Washing-Machine is a machine you use to do your washing, and a washing machine is a machine that is currently washing something. So technically a walking stick is a stick thats kind of walking (on its own!).

When someone invented a "Washing Machine" then called it that. A bad use of English, but one that very common in the modern word, thanks to the delights of Marketing. Blame the marketing department.

To conlcude, "Walking" and "Washing" in these cases are not GERUNDS, not PRESENT PARTICIPLES, but simply NOUNS.
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To conlcude, "Walking" and "Washing" in these cases are not GERUNDS, not PRESENT PARTICIPLES, but simply NOUNS.

I am sorry but I have to disagree. "Walking stick", agreed it's a noun. But 'walking"- by itself is an adjective.

what kind of machine is this?

It's a washing machine.

What kind of manager is he?

He is the tightkind.Emotion: smile
Long time waiting I see!
Surely in all these examples these - ing ending words are all adjectives describing the noun that follows each in turn? A walking stick could be a stick that is walking or a stick used for walking but neither of these uses is as a present participle. if a gerund is just an " - ing" then these are gerunds but they are anyway adjectives as they precede a noun.
if a gerund is just an " - ing" then these are gerunds but they are anyway adjectives as they precede a noun.

Hi Anon,

I find your statement too easy but partially correct. Not all “ing” ending words are gerunds. Based on my observation of your writing, I think you should know better than that.

If you will, please tell us if all these [ing] words are gerunds:

She needs a heating pad

It’s a hundred outside and we need come cooling

John is born a eating machine

He enjoys eating constantly

The other day, I saw him wolfing down 3 hamburgers and 2 milkshakes in 10 minutes.

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Goodman· I see dringking man - this is not a sentence with complete sense.

Possibilities: I see a man drinking (a soda) where drinking is a present participle of the verb “drink” describing the action.

I see a man who is drinking (a soda) ---drinking is used in it’s present progress form.

I see a man drinking from a drinking fountain -- 1st “drinking” is present participle describing what the man is doing.

The 2nd “drinking” is used as an adjective describing the fountain.

I need the drinking water--- “The” does not work in this context. Perhaps, “I need some drinking water” works better

“Drinking” is an adjective describing what kind of water it is. None of the above sentences containa a gerund.

In the following sentences “drinking” is used as gerunds:

1) Drinking a glass of wine everyday is good to your health; according to a report from NEJM.

2) Drinking and driving is hazardous to your health

3) Drinking two glasses of beer can potentially put you over the legal limit to drive.


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