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I love to go swimming. "to go" is the infinitive working as the direct object....would swimming be a gerund working as an adverbial noun?
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AnonymousI love to go swimming. "to go" is the infinitive working as the direct object..would swimming be a gerund working as an adverbial noun?
I rather doubt it. An "adverbial noun" functions as an adverb. The thing that makes a gerund a gerund is that it functions as a noun.
T
AnonymousI love to go swimming. "to go" is the infinitive working as the direct object..w
I love swimming = you are passionate about the sport.

I love to go swimming = Grammarwise, it's not wrong. As stand without further context, "to go" is not necessary, unless there is additional context.

To include"to go" in the sentnece:

I love to go swimming [in the early mornings during the hot summermonths]. I would say the underlined is a complex infinitve noun phrase functioning as a predicate.
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dimsumexpressnoun phrase functioning as a predicate.
Hi, dimsum.
I've been hearing some unfamiliar uses of the term "predicate" lately.
Wouldn't you say the main verb needs to be included in "a predicate"?

Best regards, - A.
Avangi
Hi, dimsum.
I've been hearing some unfamiliar uses of the term "predicate" lately.
Wouldn't you say the main verb needs to be included in "a predicate"?[/quote]
Hi Avangi,

What I said was " A complex infinitive noun phrase functioning as a predicate.." where" to go" is the infintive verb. Did I miss something?
I agree the problem is mine. I learned my definitions of "the subject of a sentence" and "the predicate of a sentence" in the 1940's. There's been a lot of water over the bridge since then (or under the dam).
At that time, the simple predicate of a simple sentence was the main (finite) verb. The complete predicate was the main verb plus its modifiers. There well may be other predicates that I haven't learned about. That's why I'm asking.
I hear very little about "the predicate" on EF, and as I said, much of that is strange to me.

Best regards, - A.
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AvangiI agree the problem is mine. I learned my definitions of "the subject of a sentence" and "the predicate of a sentence" in the 1940's. There's been a lot of water over the bridge since then (or under the dam).
In everyday life, does anyone really care what predicate is ? Only the English fanatics would spend the time to find out. You got plenty of company. Maybe this is helpful for anyone who gives hoot.

Definitions of predicate on the Web:
Thank you, dimsum. I shall work to digest it.

Rgdz, - A.