I met a screenplay teacher who insisted "-ing" words (I'm referring to verbals),
should not be in a screenplay. Only the simple present tense should be used.
Movies move. They're about motion. The present progressive tense is all about
motion. Perhaps this is a style thing on my part, but I like the pp tense. Should I be
worried about this? Thanks.
W : )
1 2 3 4
I met a screenplay teacher who insisted "-ing" words (I'm referring to verbals), should not be in a screenplay. Only ... thing on my part, but I like the pp tense. Should I be worried about this? Thanks. W : )

Stay away from the Participles and Jesus, too; Hollywood doesn't like religious pictures much.
As for gerunds, never mention that word around Richard Gere.
I met a screenplay teacher who insisted "-ing" words (I'm ... Should I be worried about this? Thanks. W : )

Stay away from the Participles and Jesus, too; Hollywood doesn't like religious pictures much. As for gerunds, never mention that word around Richard Gere.

ROFLMAO!!!
W : )
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I met a screenplay teacher who insisted "-ing" words (I'm referring to verbals), should not be in a screenplay. Only ... thing on my part, but I like the pp tense. Should I be worried about this? Thanks. W : )

I find that I am not distracted by literary devices or tense or mood shifts, but a lot of the people here are. And of course their opinions are worth more than mine.
I think one of the biggest mistakes (aside from my weak dialog) I made in my screenplay was trying to make the narrative interesting to read.

The consensus seems to be that I should have reduced the action to simpler statements in order to drive the action.
Stay away from the Participles and Jesus, too; Hollywood doesn't like religious pictures much. As for gerunds, never mention that word around Richard Gere.

ROFLMAO!!! W : )

I better watch it, friend of mine has a Gere movie about to premiere. -)
Stay away from the Participles and Jesus, too; Hollywood doesn't like religious pictures much. As for gerunds, never mention that word around Richard Gere.

ROFLMAO!!! W : )

That's why Skip makes the Big Money...
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I met a screenplay teacher who insisted "-ing" words (I'm referring to verbals), should not be in a screenplay. Only ... thing on my part, but I like the pp tense. Should I be worried about this? Thanks. W : )

A guy asked me that just last week. He gave examples too: "John sleeps on the sofa. Greta enters and makes noise".
Seems to me that it's hard to avoid at least one -ing word at the start of a scene. In the case above, aren't we telling the reader that is is where John sleeps every night? An example from REPO MAN (no lover of slow or unnecessary words):
EXT. SANTA MONICA FREEWAY - DAY
Traffic is moving at about 35 MPH. The Mercedes merges onto the freeway, heading west. Javal's van follows.
Strating with "traffic moves at 35 mph" seems like a clumsy way of avoiding an -ing word.
M
I met a screenplay teacher who insisted "-ing" words (I'm referring to verbals), should not be in a screenplay. Only ... thing on my part, but I like the pp tense. Should I be worried about this? Thanks. W : )

This stems from an entire generation who never actually studied English grammar.
The difference between "John sits." and "John is sitting" is not a stylistic one. It doesn't have anything to do with "moving" or "motion" or what movies are about.
They actually mean two different things.
In the former the action specified by the verb is complete within the sentence. The latter indicates an act that is on-going.

Bob shoots. John falls. John dies.
At the end of the first sentence, Bob has shot. At the end of the second, John has fallen. At the end of the the third, John is dead.

Bob is shooting. John is falling. John is dying.
At the end of the first sentence, Bob is in the midst of shooting at the end of the first sentence, Bob is still shooting.

At the end of the second sentence, John is still falling.

And most importantly, at the end of the the third sentence, John is still dying thus, not dead, still alive.
The difference between "John dies" and "John is dying" is not a stylistic one. They are saying two fundamentally different things.

NMS
I met a screenplay teacher who insisted "-ing" words (I'm ... Should I be worried about this? Thanks. W : )

A guy asked me that just last week. He gave examples too: "John sleeps on the sofa. Greta enters and ... van follows. Strating with "traffic moves at 35 mph" seems like a clumsy way of avoiding an -ing word. M

See, by nature I would write something like:
"Traffic crawls at 35 mph. A ratty Mercedes 300D slips in from the merge lane, followed closely by Javal's van."
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more