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1. What did you get at the gym?

2. Why did you go to the gym?
I have surprisingly learnt even the first sentence is fine. Would you agree?

I am training 3 times a week at a gym. A person who trains with me told me that the first sentence is correct.
Would you say ' why did you get at the shop', 'why did you get at the dentist' , etc..?
Comments  
1. Correct, but what is the meaning that you want to express?

It could mean:

Which object did you obtain at the gym?
or
Which advantages (including to your heath) did you get there?


2. Correct.

Which is the reason you went there?
Thanks Marius

Have I written the following sentence correctly?

I have surprisingly learnt even the first sentence is fine.

Should it be 'Surprisingly I have learnt even the first sentence is fine'?
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I'd say "much to my surprise"
I just want to point out, in case there is any confusion, that you were comparing two different structures in your original question.

1. What did you get at the gym? - ok, as explained previously, but are you clear that it does not have the same meaning as 'why did you go...'

Would you say ' why did you get at the shop', 'why did you get at the dentist' , etc..? - These are completely different to 'what did you get at'. 'Why did you get at...' is not a correct structure.

It seems that you may be confusing two different questions

why did you go to ...(what was your purpose in going somewhere)

and

What did you get at ...(what did you obtain from getting there).

They may sound similar in meaning but are very different.

Why did you go to the shop? Because I needed to buy some tea.

What did you get at the shop? Some tea.
Thanks everybody for the replies.
Pienne, you wrote the following:
I'd say "much to my surprise"
I would agree with you.

But my question is on my original sentence. Where do you place the word 'surprisingly' in that sentence?
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I urge someone to look at this question. Where would you place the adverb surprisingly in the following sentence?
Surprisingly I have learnt OR I have surprisingly learnt

I have surprisingly learnt even the first sentence is fine.
I'd put "surprisingly" in the first place, but with a comma. Then it would mean "in a surprising manner".
I have surprisingly learntis not going to work. Emotion: smile

You need Surprisingly, ... to mean It is surprising that ...
But I don't think you mean that it was surprising that you learned it. I think you mean that what you learned was surprising: I have learnt that, surprisingly, the first sentence is fine. or I was surprised to learn that the first sentence is fine.

CJ
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