The phrase in the subject line "get bent, you freak" has been used here of late. Sometimes, it's just "get bent," with "you freak" elsewhere in the paragraph.
In what group or location is the usage current?
I haven't heard either "get bent" or "you freak" in ages. I'm not sure they were used at the same time in the past.
Comments?
Maria Conlon
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The phrase in the subject line "get bent, you freak" has been used here of late. Sometimes, it's ... "you freak" in ages. I'm not sure they were used at the same time in the past. Comments? Maria Conlon

Having just come across the spot in which it is cited, I'd hazard a guess that it is the equivalent of "Get stuffed, you turkey." But I'm sure the young man is too polite to use such strong language.

"Get bent" I've never heard either but it has a certain resonance.

"You freak" is/was fairly common, once. "Freak out" was a favourite, even recently.
Cheers, Sage
I'd hazard a guess that it is the equivalent of "Get stuffed, you turkey." But I'm sure the young man is too polite to use such strong language. "Get bent" I've never heard either but it has a certain resonance.

I had never heard "get bent" before this thread but I agree that it would appear to be comprehensible in context.
"Freak" was common in elementary schools as early as the late 1930's. I assume it would be grounds for expulsion today. Probably replaced by "different appearing" or something PC.
GH
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The phrase in the subject line "get bent, you freak" has been used here of late. Sometimes, it's ... bent" or "you freak" in ages. I'm not sure they were used at the same time in the past. Comments?

You had to ask, Tootsie.. "Bent" is primarily BrE for "homosexual." "Get bent" (putting it in semi-clinical lingo) means "Get copulated in your rectum."

Reinhold (Rey) Aman
The phrase in the subject line "get bent, you ... at the same time in the past. Comments? Maria Conlon

Having just come across the spot in which it is cited, I'd hazard a guess that it is the equivalent ... is too polite to use such strong language. "Get bent" I've never heard either but it has a certain resonance.

"Get bent! I despise you!" From “Flappers 2 Rappers: American Youth Slang” by Tom Dalzell (Merriam-Webster Inc., Springfield, Mass., 1996).
I just want Hughes to leave me alone. He's obsessed with me, even though I've been making a real effort recently to stick to English usage in my posts here.

Christopher
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The phrase in the subject line "get bent, you freak" has been used here of late. Sometimes, it's ... "you freak" in ages. I'm not sure they were used at the same time in the past. Comments? Maria Conlon

It's a catchphrase from the show 'Phoenix Nights' written by and multi-starring Peter Kay. It's a basic variant on 'get stuffed'. The show is set in the non-existent North West of England where the phrase 'get bent' has had currency for many years. Jonathon Green, however, records it as 1960s+ US Campus.
Google on ( Peter Kay get bent ) and you'll get half a dozen hits on devoted fan sites.
get bent alone gets 36,000 hits (wha?!) including this one : http://hypertextbook.com/bent /
which claims the expression comes from 'bent' meaning 'recumbent bicycle'. I don't personally think so though MW on-line knows 'bent' as a transverse framework (as in a bridge) to carry lateral as well as vertical loads
John 'didn't get bent out of shape researching this' Dean Oxford
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The phrase in the subject line "get bent, you freak" has been used here of late. Sometimes, it's ... "you freak" in ages. I'm not sure they were used at the same time in the past. Comments? Maria Conlon

I remember "get bent" commonly used in my 1960's high school days. "you Freak" may have fuzzy origins. In the '60s AFAIR, it would have meant a grotesque person. However, in the last decade or so, it has been used to describe a promiscuous woman, which fits with the first part better.

Wake


The phrase in the subject line "get bent, you ... were used at the same time in the past. Comments?

You had to ask, Tootsie.. "Bent" is primarily BrE for "homosexual." "Get bent" (putting it in semi-clinical lingo) means "Get copulated in your rectum."

If you think that is bad, dear Maria, don't look at this.
Reinhold (Rey) Aman

The phrase in the subject line "get bent, you ... at the same time in the past. Comments? Maria Conlon

Having just come across the spot in which it is cited, I'd hazard a guess that it is the equivalent of "Get stuffed, you turkey." But I'm sure the young man is too polite to use such strong language.

More like 'get unstuffed'. :-)
The implication of the insult is that the man should lose his erection and, perhaps, even his ability to have future ones.
"Get bent" I've never heard either but it has a certain resonance.

I agree with Maria. Whereas I heard it fairly frequently back in the fifties and, perhaps, early sixties, CJ's use of it is the only time I can remember hearing it since then. But I got older, so maybe it stuck around with the teen set in America.
"You freak" is/was fairly common, once. "Freak out" was a favourite, even recently.

Odd though that CJ should call Simon a freak after Simon points out a punctuation error. Should that set a precedent, there are a whole lot of freaks `round here.

Charles Riggs
My email address: chriggs¦at¦eircom¦dot¦net
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