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Hello,

Do "get and catch" collocate well with "second wind"? Here's an example:

Breland worked up a sweat in warmups and got/caught her second wind in the first half.


Also, can we say "...and got a second wind in the first half" instead of "....and got/caught her second wind in the first half"? To me, "caught/got her second wind" sounds as if that was expected to happen.


Thank you.

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Do "get and catch" collocate well with "second wind"? Here's an example:

Breland worked up a sweat in warmups and got/caught her second wind in the first half.

Also, can we say "...and got a second wind in the first half" instead of "....and got/caught her second wind in the first half"? To me, "caught/got her second wind" sounds as if that was expected to happen.

The usual collocation is 'got his/her second wind'. 'Caught' is OK, but less common in my athletic experience.

. . . sounds as if that was expected to happen. Exactly. It was expected to happen. One of the reasons athletes warm up before starting their event is to get their second wind before they start.

'A second wind' sounds odd, probably because we think of an athlete as only possessing one 'second wind'.

Clive

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"Second wind" takes a possessive. It does not thereby have any implication of inevitability.

"Get" is usual. "Catch" is possible, I guess.

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Got/caught "a" second wind would alleviate the implication that it was forthcoming.
cobra panda 120 Got/caught "a" second wind would alleviate the implication that it was forthcoming.

No, it wouldn't. There is no such implication, and "a" does not go with "second wind".

The final thought of the person asking for help was...


"To me, "caught/got her second wind" sounds as if that was expected to happen."


He/She is obviously under the impression that "caught/got" imply expectation of a second wind. Those two words, being past particliples, actually alleviate the implication of expectation, because the "catching/getting" already occurred.


Yes, Anonomous, the word "a" can be used with a noun. Second wind is a noun.

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 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
cobra panda 120Yes, Anonomous, the word "a" can be used with a noun. Second wind is a noun.

Some collocations are dictated by usage. In fact, they all are, but most conform to prescriptive grammar to the extent that it might seem that it is the other way around. The expression "second wind" used to mean a resurgence of vitality takes a possessive. It is an expression and is thus not subject to grammatical analysis. You can't get a second wind, nor can you get the second wind, which you should also be able to by your logic. You get your second wind. I'm just trying to help, here.

"I caught my breath."

"She caught her breath."

A second wind is a term for catching one's breath or their breathing returns to normal.

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Please advise every common dictionary.
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