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Hi,
I know I can say "I'm out of here" even if I'm not IN any place you can get out. For example, if you are in the middle of a field in the country, you can still say "I'm sick of you all! I'm outta here..." - And you leave...

So, can you say "Get (the hell) out of here" to someone else, even if you are not anywhere you can really get out? Like outdoors... etc.?
Thanks Emotion: smile
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I would suggest "Get away from me!"
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Hi,

I know I can say "I'm out of here" even if I'm not IN any place you can get out. For example, if you are in the middle of a field in the country, you can still say "I'm sick of you all! I'm outta here..." - And you leave...

So, can you say "Get (the hell) out of here" to someone else, even if you are not anywhere you can really get out? Like outdoors... etc.? Yes.


You might like to note that 'Get out of here' is also, in context, used to express disbelief'. eg

Tom: Hi, Mary. I just won ten million dollars.

Mary: Get out of here! (Commonly pronounced 'Gedoudahere')

Best wishes, Clive
Thanks.

It's because my dictionary lists "out of here" as an idiom, meaning "going or leaving", without mentioning if it's leaving from inside something or not. Also, it lists "get the hell out of" and says "to leave a place very quickly", just mentioning "a place".
Emotion: smile
As Clive said, the answer to your question is yes.

You should note that to tell someone, "Get the hell out of here!" is using fairly strong language. You wouldn't likely say that to someone as a joke. Stick with, "Get out of here," "Get away from me," or (softest and least likely to offend), "Leave me alone."
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I see thanks Emotion: smile