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How to understand the structure "get sb. started"?

eg. Look at the following example to get you started.

I wonder how this structure has been formed and how to paraphrase it. And also:

I know we can say "I couldn't get the car starting". But can we say "I couldn't get the car to start" or "I couldn't get the car started(what about the structure, right or wrong)"?
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In my humble opinion (read below):
Get(or have in some cases) + object + past participle is used when we want to say that somebody arranges for something to be done by someone else. In your example the object is you.

eg. Look at the following example to get you started

So, the example helps you to make a start.

"I couldn't get the car starting".- Starting is a present participle which is not the correct form to use.

You can sayI couldn't get the car startedwhich is a past participle used as adjective, or

You can sayI couldn't get the car to startwhich is in bare infinitive form.

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Qingqingor "I couldn't get the car started(what about the structure, right or wrong)"?
right
It has the same meaning as:
I couldn't start the car
Goodman

"I couldn't get the car starting".- Starting is a present participle which is not the correct form to use.

You can sayI couldn't get the car startedwhich is a past participle used as adjective, or

You can sayI couldn't get the car to startwhich is in bare infinitive form.



I little bit offtopic but I'll ask anyway :-)
What about the present participle in these sentences?
He denied hearing the police warnings.
Tony mentioned meeting Emma...
Selecter
Goodman

"I couldn't get the car starting".- Starting is a present participle which is not the correct form to use.

You can sayI couldn't get the car startedwhich is a past participle used as adjective, or

You can sayI couldn't get the car to startwhich is in bare infinitive form.



I little bit offtopic but I'll ask anyway :-)
What about the present participle in these sentences?
He denied hearing the police warnings.
Tony mentioned m


What about the present participle in these sentences?
He denied hearing the police warnings.
Tony mentioned meeting Emma...


[Hearing] and [meeting] are both used as present participle and they are correct.



Sometimes, people get confused with present participle for gerund. Although they are the same words but when placed in different part of the speech, their functions are changed.



She doesn’t like hiking. – [hiking] is a gerund here.

The storm went on all night, [whipping] the rain against my window so loud that I couldn’t sleep.- here [whipping] is a present participle.



eeting Emma...

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Goodman
"I couldn't get the car starting".- Starting is a present participle which is not the correct form to use.

You can sayI couldn't get the car startedwhich is a past participle used as adjective, or

You can sayI couldn't get the car to startwhich is in bare infinitive form.

But we can find many examples such as "At last the bus started." and "Press the button and the machine will start."(active voice)

And also I find an example:"It's so cold. I can't get the car moving."
I can't get the car starting is incorrect. There is a big difference in context between 'can't get the car moving' and can't get the car started'.

starting/moving - this mean an ongoing action. The car moves and continues to move. The car 'starts' only for a brief moment. After that it is moving or running.

He is just starting the car - correct as he is attempting to make the car start. starting is ok as that is the action he is undertaking, however briefly.

He can't get the car moving - ok as moving is an ongoing action.

He can't get the car started - correct as the 'start' is only a brief action, not ongoing as would be suggested by 'starting'. The car will not be continuing to start. The 'starting' becomes almost instantaneously a past event.

He can't get the car moved - incorrect (in this sense) as the car does continue moving. It is not something that just happens briefly and so become instantly a past event.

The car only starts once. It is a brief action that becomes a past event once it has been achieved. The car continues to move in the present.
There's also this meaning:

to get someone started on a topic=to encourage someone to speak

as in:

Don't get me started (on this)!
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