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"I get to sleep in the afternoon in the classroom."
Can "get" be used in progressive tense in a similar sense as in "I am not getting to sleep now." ?
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That sentence doesn't sound natural, but you might say, "I'm not going to sleep now," to mean what I think you are trying to convey in that sentence.

You could use "getting" as follows: "I'm not getting to sleep as early as I would like these days." or, "I'm not getting enough sleep this week due to my work schedule."

I get to sleep in the afternoon in the classroom means that it is possible or allowable for you to sleep in the classroom. If you say, "I get to sleep about 10 every night," it means that you go to sleep about ten every night. The meaning of "get" in the two situations is different.

I'm sure this sounds a bit confusing, but I hope the examples help.
Yes, it seems possible to me.
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Except in the phrase get to sleep (= go to sleep) I find the structure of to sleep with get unnatural. But yes, it could be used in the progressive: I'm not getting to sleep very quickly these days.

My first understanding of your original "I get to sleep in the afternoon in the classroom" was that you have the opportunity or permission to sleep there (another use of the word get) That's why I try to avoid get at all costs, substituting a synonym for that catch-all word with dozens and dozens of meanings).
You could say, "I am not getting to sleep now," in the context of "I'm not being allowed to sleep now," but not in the context meaning going to sleep now.

Although this is very common usage among native speakers, I can see how it would be incredibly confusing to someone learning the language. "Get" used with sleep is not the most precise way to convey meaning as another poster indicated.
I meant it in the sense that I do not have the permission or opportunity to sleep now.
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Debpriya De"I get to sleep in the afternoon in the classroom."Can "get" be used in progressive tense in a similar sense as in "I am not getting to sleep now." ?
I think you're aiming at something like these:

I fall asleep in the classroom in the afternoon(s). (You're no longer awake once this happens.)

I get sleepy in the classroom in the afternoon(s). (You drift off. You are barely awake.)

I'm falling asleep. (Now. You're about to nod off to sleep.)

I'm getting sleepy. (Now. You're becoming sleepy.)

CJ
No, I meant it in the sense that the teachers are not allowing me to sleep now. So I am not getting to sleep now as in "I am not getting to do what I want to do".
Debpriya DeNo, I meant it in the sense that the teachers are not allowing me to sleep now. So I am not getting to sleep now as in "I am not getting to do what I want to do".
OK. So then it's

I don't get to sleep in class. (I never get to do this. I'm not allowed to do it.)
I'm not getting to sleep in class. (During these days, I am not now being allowed to sleep in class.)

You can use the progressive.

The problem is not with the use of the progressive; it's that get to sleep (or getting to sleep) has a different meaning as well, so I think we're all confused about which meaning you're working with as the two different meanings are interfering with one another.

I'm not getting to sleep early enough, so I'm tired all day. (I'm not going to bed early enough.)

It's unfortunate that you chose the verb sleep. Another verb might have been easier to deal with. Emotion: smile

CJ
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