We were watching the BBC version of "Life On Mars" last night and Sam told The Guv something, adding that he wasn't "getting Dorothy on you." The implication was that he wasn't being sentimental or soft or touchy-feely in what he was suggesting, it was a practical suggestion. For those of you who never saw this TV show, it's set in Manchester, U.K., in 1973.
I've never heard the term "getting Dorothy on you" before. Is this a common British term or was it back in 1973? Is it derived from Dorothy of Oz fame or just a general femal name to connote a less than manly attitude?
Paul
We were watching the BBC version of "Life On Mars" last night and Sam told The Guv something, adding that ... it derived from Dorothy of Oz fame or just a general femal name to connote a less than manly attitude?

It's completely new to me. I lived in Manchester from 1959 to 1972.

I wonder whether this from the OED might be relevant:

Dorothy, n.
a friend of Dorothy (slang), a homosexual man. Also in similar allusive uses.
..

1984 MCCONVILLE & SHEARLAW Slanguage of Sex (1985) 82/1 Dorothy'sfriends, the male gay community, from the 50s onwards. ..

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
We were watching the BBC version of "Life On Mars" ... general femal name to connote a less than manly attitude?

It's completely new to me. I lived in Manchester from 1959 to 1972. I wonder whether this from the OED might be relevant: Dorothy, n. a friend of Dorothy (slang), a homosexual man. Also in similar allusive uses.

That's immediately what came to mind for me the Judy Garland/Dorothy gay expression of "a friend of Dorothy's".
It's not my field at all, but my gut reaction is that 1973 is a bit early for "friend of Dorothy" to have worked its way into non-gay usage; I'd have guessed it was still largely an undercover/cant identification phrase at that date.
(The other option is that it's some sort of rhyming slang, but I don't have the foggiest as to what it might have been.)

Cheers, Harvey
CanEng and BrEng, indiscriminately mixed
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On 05 May 2010, Peter Duncanson (BrE) wrote

It's completely new to me. I lived in Manchester from ... Dorothy (slang), a homosexual man. Also in similar allusive uses.

That's immediately what came to mind for me the Judy Garland/Dorothy gay expression of "a friend of Dorothy's". It's ... that it's some sort of rhyming slang, but I don't have the foggiest as to what it might have been.)

I'm convinced on the imformation so far produced that it is the Judy Garland/Dorothy gay origin. The only possibility I could think of for rhyming slang, or otherwise, was Dorothy Perkins, the women's clothing retail chain, but I couldn't "create" a connection. http://www.dorothyperkins.com/

Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)