Hi
Could you help me check these two paragraphs.
Thank you very much

1. This course is called Rice Cake Rolls-Ups.

Chinese New Year is the most important holiday celebrated out of 24 Chinese holidays. As a nation that places much importance on eating, it is natural that food is emphasized during this New Year period. Rice cake is a traditional food served on New Year’s Day. The Chinese pronunciation for rice cake sounds similar to characters that define each coming year to surpass the previous year.

2. This course is called Family fortune delight.

Ingredients are fresh squid?eggs?carrot?lean pork ?green onions?ginger slices?mushroom?snow peas and tree ear. This course symbolizes an abundance of all good things. It is said to be bring prosperity.
Just the glaring errors.

*Of all 24 Chinese holidays, Chinese New Year is the most celebrated holiday. As a *people (you haven't mentioned China as a subject) who places much importance on food, *Chinese (be consistent) eat a lot during *the Chinese New Year.

The Chinese pronunciation for "rice cake" sounds similar to *that for the characters that define each coming year. (be specific, what are the characters?)

2. This course is called Family fortune delight. (either capitalize the whole thing or not at all)

Ingredients are fresh squid?eggs?***?lean pork ?green onions?ginger slices?(this is not Chinese, we don't use that punctuation in English! Use comma) ***?snow peas and *wood ear (we call it wood ear).
Is course the correct word? Do you perhaps mean recipe (a set of instructions on making a food dish)?

1. As a nation that places much importance on eating, it is natural that food is emphasized during this New Year period. Sorry, Julielai, I do not agree with your changes here. This sentence is fine as it is, emphasising food as an element of a celebration does not necessarily mean that people eat a lot, it could be that food plays an important ritual part, or that there are certain dishes it is traditional to serve.
I do not understand the final sentence in this paragraph.

2.I have no idea what snow peas are but assume they are a Chinese pea, so ok.
Tree ear – I could not even start to guess what this is, but equally I couldn’t guess what a ‘wood-ear’ is either, so if Tree ear is the correct local name you should stick with it!
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Nona,

The word "course" is a bit confusing, but the word can mean "a part of a meal served as a unit at one time" (dictionary.com). During the Chinese New Year, Chinese eat many courses -- poultry, vegetable, soup, beef, fish, shrimp . . . ten courses, to say the least.

Re: #1:
I'm Chinese myself and I can safely say that Chinese eat a lot during the New Year. (You guys mistook me for a native speaker)

I changed the sentence because:

As a nation that places much importance on eating, (Am I right here? Feel free to comment)

I rewrote the sentence into something I believe does happen. Not exactly a paraphrase, I admit.

I don't know what rice cakes the poster is referring to, so I can't say for sure if the sentence is right.

Re: #2
If you go to a Chinese grocery store, you'll see that most "mu-er" packages are called "wood ear". In Chinese, both tree and wood can be called "mu"--hence the confusion.
Hello all

I thought I could smell food.

There is something odd about the sentence that begins: 'As a nation that
places much importance on eating...' I think it's the fact that there's
no grammatical connection between the two clauses. It might be worth
considering: ''As China is a nation that places much importance on
eating...'

Also, it should really be 'pronunciation of', rather than 'pronunciation for'.

Just my 2¢. Hope no one minds if I help myself to a few of these. Hmm.
Not bad...

MrP
You're right. It really should be "of".
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Just my 2¢. Hope no one minds if I help myself to a few of these. Hmm.
Not bad...


No, not at all. We could use all the help we can get. Hope to see you here more often. Emotion: smile

MountainHiker
Question for you guys:

Doesn't it sound strange to have "eating" as a national emphasis? After all, it's a cultural custom, not a national practice.

Besides, many overseas Chinese still follow the custom.
Hello Julielai

If I understand correctly, I suppose 'the Chinese nation' [= nation] could be regarded
as a subset of 'all the Chinese people in the world' [= culture].

Whether the statements are true or not is another matter...

I agree with your original point, though: that the 'As a nation...' clause doesn't relate to
a subject in the following clause, and is therefore ungrammatical.

MrP
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