Given a news of someone's death,

It hits me to hear/learn of/about his death.
It hits me to hear/learn his death.

I did google books search, and I found all the six were used.
I wonder what are the differences with and without the prepositions.

Best Regards
In BE we couldn't say 'it hits me' in such a case; I find the impersonal construction very inappropriate. We'd say something like -

I am very sorry...
I was most upset...
Hi,
Given a news of someone's death,

It hits me to hear/learn of/about his death.
It hits me to hear/learn his death.

I did google books search, and I found all the six were used.
I wonder what are the differences with and without the prepositions.

The versions without the prepositions sound odd to me. I never hear them.

I agree that 'hit me' in this form sounds strange. Perhaps the writer was thinking of the idiom 'It hit me hard', meaning it had a strong impact on me.

Note that 'news' is not countable. You can't say 'a news'. Say, eg the news or some news or news.
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CliveThe versions without the prepositions sound odd to me. I never hear them.

Roger that.


I agree that 'hit me' in this form sounds strange. Perhaps the writer was thinking of the idiom 'It hit me hard', meaning it had a strong impact on me.

So, I should write "It hit me hard as I heard of his death"?

[I now know that it would be more proper to say "I am very sorry ... "]


Note that 'news' is not countable. You can't say 'a news'. Say, eg the news or some news or news.

I cannot believe I made such a mistake. (blush)
Thank you!
Hi,
So, I should write "It hit me hard as I heard of his death"?
More common is 'when' instead of 'as'.

[I now know that it would be more proper to say "I am very sorry ... "]
Your original used past tense, so consider 'I was very sorry . . .'

Best wishes, Clive
I may be responsible for the I am very sorry...

In BE we could easily say:

I am very sorry to hear that....
I was very sorry to hear that...
I'm most upset that...
I was most upset that...

I suspect the past tense is usually the more appropriate, but you'll hear the present very often too.

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Thank you two~