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I just heard some people pronouncing "S" like "SH/ZH" (Depends on a word)
before and after "R".

Examples:

'I've never seen anything like it." ( never Sheen).

"Making my demons run." (my demonZH run).

Of course I know that this happens with the words starting with "Y" (you, year etc.)

'As you know...' (Azh you know)

'That you?' (Thach you)

And how about R?

Thanks.
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Speakers tend to pronounce "demon" as demon[d] or demon[dz], when -s is added.
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Only "w" and "y" sounds are glides, so whatever this phenomenon is, it is not "glide absorption". I have not heard the effect you are talking about; I intend to listen closely and see if I catch anyone speaking that way!

CJ
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Comments  
'I've never seen anything like it." ( never Sheen).
"Making my demons run." (my demonZH run).


In the first example, the reason why this happens is because the way English speakers pronounce the sound /r/ is slightly further back than where they pronounce the /s/ sound. So their tongue stays in the same place as where they pronouced /r/ and you get the 'sh' noise.

In the second example the tongue prepares for the /r/ sound and articulates /s/.
As you know...' (Azh you know)
'That you?' (Thach you)


The place of articulation for /s/ and /t/ is the same. The 'y' sound (/j/ in IPA), is further back. So /s/ and /t/ got retracted, resulting in what you hear.

eq
Speakers tend to pronounce "demon" as demon[d] or demon[dz], when -s is added.


/n/, /d/, /s/ and /z/ have the same place of articulation. So in the first example, if you say 'demon', you will find that your tongue is touching you alveolar ridge, the hard bit behind your teeth. Release your tongue with some air, you hear the /t/ sound. The /n/ sound can influence the /t/ to sound like a /d/.

In the second example, /d/ influences the /s/ to come out as a /z/.

eq
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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
[the] tongue stays in the same place as where they pronouced /r/ and you get the 'sh' noise.


Nice call, Eq. Alveo-palatals! (On seeing SH/ZH, I assumed palatal-fricatives. . .)

Nice example of regressive and progressive assimilation, though:

(1)neve[r] Emotion: shakeeenEmotion: shake represents a voiceless alveo-palatal

/s/ > Emotion: shake / [r]___ (Progressive Assimilation)

(2) demon[zh] [r]un [zh] represents a voiced alveo-palatal

/s/ > [z] / [n] ___ (Voicing)
[z] > [zh] / ___ [r] (Regressive Assimilation)

Thanks. (L)