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Hi,

"This portion is too small for a gourmand like you".

(Context: a small talk between a wife and husband :-)

1. Is this example good English?

2. Is it true that GOURMAND is "more delicate" than GLUTTON in most contents?

3. Which of the words synonymous with GLUTTON are the least "strong"?

Hope my questions make sense...

4. Is it true that most AE speakers put the stress on the second syllable in GOURMAND?

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"This portion is too small for a gourmand like you".

(Context: a small talk between a wife and husband :-)

1. Is this example good English? It's correct English, but it is so stiff and formal that it sounds ludicrous.

It might sound OK in a context where both people are well-educated and the wife is trying to be sarcastic.


2. Is it true that GOURMAND is "more delicate" than GLUTTON in most contents? Yes


3. Which of the words synonymous with GLUTTON are the least "strong"? eg He's a big eater.

Hope my questions make sense...

4. Is it true that most AE speakers put the stress on the second syllable in GOURMAND? I don't know.

Clive

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Comments  
vlivef

Hi,

"This portion is too small for a gourmand like you". It's polite, humorous.

(Context: a small talk between a wife and husband :-)

1. Is this example good English? - It comes from French, or is influenced from borrowing, but usage always changes over time. For me, I have only heard it as a polite way to call someone an overeater or pig, or even just as a joke to mean they love food, love good food, are always starving and like to snack,etc. It means lots of things but it is most definitely polite.

2. Is it true that GOURMAND is "more delicate" than GLUTTON in most contents? Yes. There's no softer word for glutton than this. This site has a little history about the influence of borrowing:

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gourmand

3. Which of the words synonymous with GLUTTON are the least "strong"? Gourmand actually.

Hope my questions make sense...

4. Is it true that most AE speakers put the stress on the second syllable in GOURMAND? What's AE? Australian or American? Merriam Webster's is American. You can listen (see above link). As for Canadian English, maybe someone else can comment since the country's bilingual.

If you check the French pronunciation, too. The accent is on the second.

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.

It's really not stiff. I have to disagree.

Of course, it would be helpful to know the purpose and audience and reason for some of these questions-- before we close down discussions.

Glutton is insulting. It is like calling someone a pig.

Gourmand is an elitist word used to describe someone who demands very fancy, expensive food.

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
nel0506
vlivef

Hi,

"This portion is too small for a gourmand like you". It's polite, humorous.

(Context: a small talk between a wife and husband :-)

Thank you for your comments, nel0506! I was really confused when I read Clive's answer (=stiff sentence, etc. ) ... It's very curious that one and the same sentence can sound odd ("stiff") to some native speakers yet look OK (polite and humorous) to others... You never know where your are with English :-)



sentence doesn't look

AlpheccaStars

Glutton is insulting. It is like calling someone a pig.

Gourmand is an elitist word used to describe someone who demands very fancy, expensive food.

1. Therefore "gourmand" is not synonymous with GLUTTON, BIG EATER, etc.?

2. Therefore GOURMAND and GOURMET mean exactly the same thing?

Sorry for so many followup questions but I am totally confused now...

vlivef2. Therefore GOURMAND and GOURMET mean exactly the same thing?

The gourmand is someone whose chief pleasure in life is eating; sometimes with a discriminating taste (The definition in this regard has changed over time)

A glutton is someone who stuffs themselves silly; they are indiscriminate in what they eat.

A gourmet is an expert, a connoisseur of good food and wine. They may eat very modest amounts.

The main difference is frequency of usage. I have seen gourmand maybe 2-3 times in the last 5 years. Gourmet is very very common.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

A hundred years ago "gourmand" (accent on the second syllable) meant glutton, but today (in the US) it has lost most of this unpleasant sense and is used almost synonymously with "gourmet (who likes to eat heartily)."

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