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Do you guys want to come with us? And

Do you guys want to go with us?

Are you guys going with us? And

Are you guys coming with us?

If you guys want to come with us...And

If you guys want to go with us....

What's the difference between these three sentences? Or do they essentially mean the same things?

Thanks again!
Comments  
Hi,

come - suggests the speaker's mind is focused on the destination

go - suggests it is focused on the starting point

Clive
CliveHi,come - suggests the speaker's mind is focused on the destinationgo - suggests it is focused on the starting pointClive
Hi Clive,

So basically all three examples above essentially mean the same thing?

Thanks.
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Hi,

Subject to what I explained, yes.

Clive
Hi,
Well, what I explained is one subtle difference. Here are a couple more comments.
Do you guys want to come with us? And
Do you guys want to go with us?

Are you guys going with us? And
Are you guys coming with us?
This does not explicitly speak about 'want'.
Maybe they are going with us, but they don't want to. Perhaps they are being forced to, in some way.

If you guys want to come with us...And
If you guys want to go with us..
Unlike the earlier examples, these are conditional statmements that are incomplete.

Clive
What about this:

We're going to the zoo tomorrow and I'm on the phone with a friend and I say this to him:

"if you want to come with us tmrw, we can leave later since you guys are so far away."

Can the quoted sentence be used and is it grammatically correct?

Thank you very much.
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Hi,

What about this:

We're going to the zoo tomorrow and I'm on the phone with a friend and I say this to him:

"if you want to come with us tmrw, we can leave later since you guys are so far away."

Can the quoted sentence be used Yes and is it grammatically correct? Yes

Clive
PreciousJonesWhat's the difference between these three sentences? Or do they essentially mean the same things?
There are six sentences, not three. If you're mostly interested in "come with us" vs "go with us", here's a way of looking at it. "We" are the ones going to the destination, so "we" (or where "we" are) is the reference location.

REFERENCE
V

you come>>>(to us); (then) we (you and we) go (together) >>> to > destination

motion toward the reference | motion away from the reference
motion from the source motion toward the destination

You join us. We and you both travel to the destination.

You come with us You go with us

emphasizes this part. emphasizes this part.

I'm not sure everyone would agree with me, but it is one way of thinking about it.

CJ