Why do people use that word, "Dutch"? I want to know the history about that.

Plucky Jerry, P
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Why do people use that word, "Dutch"? I want to know the history about that.

See ,

for example, among others to which I was referred by the search facility on the AUE FAQ page.

Odysseus
Why do people use that word, "Dutch"? I want to know the history about that.

Once upon a time, about the seventeenth century, the Anglophones loved to denigrate the Dutch as sleazy, wanton bastards without even a modicum of decency. Of course, it was all wishful thinking.
Plucky Jerry, P

Yeah, well, bring it on, Jerry!
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Why do people use that word, "Dutch"? I want to know the history about that.

Once upon a time, about the seventeenth century, the Anglophones loved to denigrate the Dutch as sleazy, wanton bastards without even a modicum of decency. Of course, it was all wishful thinking.

The English had been beaten by the Dutch
(under their Memorable admiral Van Broom)
in three successive Anglo-Dutch wars,
and the English were just bad losers.
But 'Dutch treat' isn't all there is to 'Dutch'
in English and American usage.
The little monograph by Spruijt on the subject, 'Total Dutch' lists over a thousand different ones.
(including related info, like attemps at explanations for the 'Dutch' nicknames of some American presidents and gangsters.)

Not all of it derives from the 'Dutch' though:
much American usage of 'Dutch'
comes from later German immigrants,
and derives from 'Deutsch' rather than Dutch.
Best,
Jan
Who is this Van Broom? I can find nothing about him on the internet. The great Van Tromp and De Ruyter, now they were "memorable".

English jokes against the Dutch preceded those Anglo-Dutch wars, I believe. But we were hospitable to the Dutch at various times in history; there were populations of Dutch in England during Shakespeare's time, for example, when we had an enclave at Flushing. And Burgundy, which included part of the Netherlands, had been our chief ally under Henry V.

Peasemarch.
Why do people use that word, "Dutch"? I want to know the history about that.

Once upon a time, about the seventeenth century, the Anglophones loved to denigrate the Dutch as sleazy, wanton bastards without even a modicum of decency.

And deceitful, apparently. A Dutch uncle is not a real uncle, a Dutch oven is not a real oven, Dutch courage is not real courage, and a Dutch treat is no treat at all.

http://www.genjerdan.com/nvm/tdis/index.html
Of course it's music. It has notes in it, doesn't it?
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Once upon a time, about the seventeenth century, the Anglophones loved to denigrate the Dutch as sleazy, wanton bastards without even a modicum of decency.

And deceitful, apparently. A Dutch uncle is not a real uncle, a Dutch oven is not a real oven, Dutch courage is not real courage,and a Dutch treat is no treat at all.

Partridge says the "uncle" usage was in fact based on an idea that the Dutch were strict disciplinarians.
Mike.
Who is this Van Broom? I can find nothing about him on the internet. The great Van Tromp and De Ruyter, now they were "memorable".

He is confused about Van Tromp who sailed up the estuary to Chatham and destroyed our fleet. He sailed home with a broom at his masthead declaring that he 'had swept the English from the seas'. IIRC

Mike

M.J.Powell
Once upon a time, about the seventeenth century, the Anglophones loved to denigrate the Dutch as sleazy, wanton bastards without even a modicum of decency.

And deceitful, apparently. A Dutch uncle is not a real uncle, a Dutch oven is not a real oven, Dutch courage is not real courage, and a Dutch treat is no treat at all.

Or so it is claimed by armchair etymologists. I would hate for it to be stated so often without challenge that it is believed to be true.

A Dutch treat is* a kind of treat, just with a different financial arrangement than you, Poet Fury, appear to like. A Dutch oven *is* a kind of oven, in which food is baked, and it appears to be as old or older than the ovens in stoves. A Dutch uncle *might* be an uncle, it is some who speaks to you sternly, and it's usually used as a simile anyway ("like a Dutch uncle"). The courage *is a kind of courage, but it's one whose source is alcohol.
So, these completely fail to demonstrate that "Dutch" ever meant "not" or "false." It may have in some other compounds, but it didn't here. No more than "French toast" means "not toast" or "Spanish rice" means "not rice."

Donna Richoux
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