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Hi

What is the difference between going in the same class and going to the same class as in:

Me and my friend went to/in the same class in middle school.

Thanks
Comments  
Only went to the same class is natural.

My friend and I ...
Me and my friend went to the same class in middle school.

I went to the same class in middle school.
My friend went to the same class in middle school.
Hence, My friend and I went to the same class in middle school.
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My friend and I were in the same class.
But what if I accidentally opened a conversation with "me and my friend" , how am I supposed to structure my sentence then? It would be too awkward to say

Me and my friend... oops I mean, my friend and I went to the same blah blah....

Thank you all for your answers
MustAskIt would be too awkward
I don't think it would. There's nothing wrong with correcting your own speech in conversation, especially if you're still learning the language.
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So "me and my friend" sounds somehow odd and incorrect? How about if I casually said this instead " Me and my friend... we uhmm , we went to the same class..."
MustAskSo "me and my friend" sounds somehow odd and incorrect?
It's not odd; in fact, it's quite common among careless native speakers. Nonetheless, it's ungrammatical, and I don't suggest making a habit of it.
"Me and my friend" is never correct as the subject of a sentence. Correcting yourself is fine. If you casually said
MustAsk " Me and my friend... we uhmm , we went to the same class..."
I would be wincing and saying to myself "My friend and I! My friend and I!"
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