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i would like to know two things.

the first one is : the past participle of the verb "go", is it "been"?

ex: i have been to London.
have you ever been to London?
i think that "go" in this case has irregular form in the past participle which is "been" and that why we use the preposition "to" we don't say " i have been in London" we use "to" as if we say i will go to London" not "in London"
is that right?

secondary : the adverb never. we study at school that the key words of the simple present tense always, often...and never.
ex: he never plays football with his friends.

but what i notice is that "never" is used mostly with the present perfect tense.
ex: i have never seen Petra.
they have never climbed a mountain.

now my question how i can differentiate between the two sentences if there is "never" in both of them? especially in the correct the form of the verb in the following sentences

ex: they never _______ aboard "travel"

is it : they have never traveled abroad.
they never travel abroad.

Finally; i would say thanks for your patience and reading the questions.
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ericsteefthe past participle of the verb "go", is it "been"?
No. It's gone.
ericsteef"go" in this case has irregular form in the past participle which is "been"
That seems logical, but normally we analyze the situation differently. We say that the forms with [have/has/had] been to are idioms, and retain the idea that gone is the (only) past participle of go, and been is the (only) past participle of be. (An idiom is, as you already know, an expression in which meaning depends on a particular grouping of words, regardless of how they are usually used separately.)
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ericsteefex: they never _______ aboard "travel"

is it : they have never traveled abroad.
they never travel abroad.
It is my assumption that the excercise does not permit you to add words anywhere except where the blank line is drawn. In this case, for example, you cannot add have before never. There is no blank line there. Therefore, only They never travel abroad is possible.

In a real conversation, of course, you can use either tense: They never travel or They have never traveled. The meaning is different, of course, but both are grammatically correct.

CJ
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Your uses of never are fine.

The forms of go are go, goes, going, gone

I think that you find 'have you ever been in' or 'have you ever gone to' used equally.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
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Hi,

I more commonly say 'Have you ever been to in Montreal?'

Clive
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