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1. I go to bed at 12

2. I go to sleep at 12

3. I hit the sack at 12.

Q1) Do you use or hear all of them when talking about sleeping?

Q2) Doesn't 2 have another meaning?

Q3) What other expressions are there?
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Comments  
Q1) Do you use or hear all of them when talking about sleeping?-- I seldom hear 'hit the sack' anymore.

Q2) Doesn't 2 have another meaning?-- Not that I am aware of.

Q3) What other expressions are there?-- Oh, there has been other slang around over the years: turn in, hit the pillow, catch some Zs...
Thank you ^^

In my dictionary, 2 has this meaning: be unable to feel anything in your leg, etc. because it has been in a particular position for a long time.

and what is Zs in 'catch some Zs'?
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I go to sleep at 12 does not mean to lose feeling, or get 'pins & needles', in a body part. In the first place, it is involuntary so it cannot be timed, and in the second place, it is the body part, not you yourself, who falls asleep: My leg fell asleep while I was watching Gone the the Wind today.
Thank you^^

You mean, we say 'I go to bed at 12', but not 'I go to sleep at 12?' Then, do we say, 'Hey, I'll go to sleep soon'?

And the definition I brought for 'go to sleep' is not used? (I don't understand 'In the first place, ~~ in the second place' wellㅜ.ㅜ)
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No, no. You suggested that 'go to sleep' could have the 2nd meaning (lose feeling, etc) in your sentence, and my post is denying that, nothing else.
I reviewed this post again today.

I got question after reviewing this post again today.

Mr.Micauber said in the first answer '

Q1) Do you use or hear all of them when talking about sleeping?-- I seldom hear 'hit the sack' anymore.'

Here 'anymore' means, you hear 'hit the sack' less than seldom?(emphasising you don't almost hear it?) or you hear it often?

In other words:

I got confused because of 'anymore'

I seldom hear 'hit the sack' anymore. - I don't even seldom hear 'hit the sack?'

I seldom hear 'hit the sack.'
Anymore (one word) = nowadays as compared to previous times.

The adverb anymore meaning “any longer” or “nowadays” is most commonly spelled as one word. It is used in negative constructions and in some types of questions: Sally doesn't work here anymore. Do you play tennis anymore? In some dialects, chiefly South Midland in origin, it is found in positive statements meaning “nowadays”: Baker's bread is all we eat anymore. Anymore we always take the bus. Its use at the beginning of a sentence is almost exclusive to speech or to representations of speech. (Random House)
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