1 2 3 4 5 6 7
attitude. "Go to the advance for Well in my parents ... Even as a child I thought this rather daft.

There's a episode in "Penrod" by Booth Tarkington (1914) in which the neighborhood boys decide it's okay to say "hell" as long as it is preceded by "heaven." I see the book is on line; the relevant chapters are here and the one following: http://www.online-literature.com/tarkington/penrod/26 /

Tarkington, and a lot of other people in his time, had great fun playing with those taboos. In Seventeen , his little-girl character Jane got permission from her mother to repeat things she shouldn't have overheard in the first place by agreeing to replace the swear-words with "word". I often think of her when reading the latest work in the Joey Canon.

http://tinyurl.com/bp5nh .
Hello everyone, I was narrating a business conversation to my girlfriend. I have mentioned that the business dealing lead me ... were considered swear words. Could someone please correct me if I am wrong? Thank you in advance for any clarification.

When I was a boy (in England), "hell" and "damn" were definitely swear words. Here in Australia, many small children, no doubt indoctrinated by PCers, think that "shut up" is a swear word. Today, regrettably, there are hardly any swear words left, or at least barely any that can't be heard on TV.

Rob Bannister
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Subba Rao:

Ray O'Hara:
It is a mild swear. Use "A devil may care attitude" it means the same and won't offend anyone.

Brian Wickham:
I interpret the two as having different meanings. A person who loves to party, or burn the candle at both ... care" attitude. But a person who says, "screw you, I'm doing it my way" has a "go to hell" attitude.

Agreed. A devil-may-care attitude might be a "what the hell" attitude, but not a "go to hell" attitude.

Mark Brader > In the face of such devastating logic as "despite Toronto > what you say you mean, you must mean this and you (Email Removed) > are wrong", I cede the territory. Truly Donovan
(snip)

As children (1940s) we were taught various songs where "the other place" and other euphemisms are used.

********?

Nah. The House of Commons, innit.
Giles
Hello everyone, I was narrating a business conversation to my ... not know that "Go to hell" was a swear word/phrase.

Of course it is.

The expression may be, but the girlfriend's mistake was to infer that "hell" is a swear word. It may have been in the distant past in a number of contexts, but no longer. "Go to hell" is one of the few contexts I can think of where the word is part of a swear. "To hell with you" is another, but that's about it.

Charles Riggs
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Of course it is.

The expression may be, but the girlfriend's mistake was to infer that "hell" is a swear word. It may have ... think of where the word is part of a swear. "To hell with you" is another, but that's about it.

Oh, hell! I thought there were more.

Bob Lieblich
And enough of those double hockey sticks
At 07:57:34 on Sun, 30 Oct 2005, Robert Lieblich
(Email Removed) wrote in (Email Removed):
The expression may be, but the girlfriend's mistake was to ... "To hell with you" is another, but that's about it.

Oh, hell! I thought there were more.

Hell's teeth! So did I.

Molly Mockford
They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety - Benjamin Franklin (My Reply-To address *is* valid, though may not remain so for ever.)
Oh, hell! I thought there were more.

Hell's teeth! So did I.

Hell's bells!

John Hall
Johnson: "Well, we had a good talk."
Boswell: "Yes, Sir, you tossed and gored several persons." Dr Samuel Johnson (1709-84); James Boswell (1740-95)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Hell's bells!

...and buckets of blood! (A very satisfying oath.)

"Get the hell out of here. What the hell do you think you're doing?" I suppose many people intensify that to "***" nowadays.

About the mildest I can think of is "hell of a," as in "he's a helluva guy." Which is praise, of course.

Best Donna Richoux
Show more