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Tony Mountifield emailed this:
Original Poster In US English this looses the 'off' to become 'I was

... loses ... (unless you mean "sets free")

Thank you for the 'get out' (pun intended), I did indeed mean to 'set free' the 'off'.
While we're on this subject, do readers think of the phrase 'I was really *** off' as swearing?

Hardly. Some might get pissoir'd off at top-posting, though.

James Follett
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John Briggs emailed this:

Perhaps I could mention the loose use of "loose" for "lose"?

No, you should be above that. :-) How embarrassing, I feel like I've been 'named and shamed'.

as if...

John Briggs
...and buckets of blood! (A very satisfying oath.) "Get the hell out of here. What the hell do you think ... mildest I can think of is "hell of a," as in "he's a helluva guy." Which is praise, of course.

A lot of things get intensified to *** these days.

How are you Sebastian old bean?
Intensified to ***, thanks for asking you old fart.

Martin Willett
http://mwillett.org
At 15:53:04 on Sun, 30 Oct 2005, Donna Richoux (Email Removed) wrote in :
About the mildest I can think of is "hell of a," as in "he's a helluva guy." Which is praise, of course.

Which can also mutate, of course...
"Brownie, you're doing a heck of a job."
Yes, it was certainly one HELL of a job that he did :-(
Molly Mockford
They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety - Benjamin Franklin (My Reply-To address *is* valid, though may not remain so for ever.)
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Indeed it does, as do such expressions as "Hell's teeth". But "Go to hell" is cursing.

~
Pretty mild, though, IMHO - "go forth and multiply" is much worse! -D
Nick
I don't agree that there's any difference (in this context) between swearing, cursing and cussing, or between a profanity, a curse and an oath. Adrian

"Cursing" comes from the ancient practice of laying an actual curse on a person, e.g. "May the devil take you!" or "God damn you!", whereas swearing can be any obscenity. Cussing is slang for cursing.
I don't agree that there's any difference (in this context) between swearing, cursing and cussing, or between a profanity, a curse and an oath. Adrian

"Cursing" comes from the ancient practice of laying an actual curse on a person, e.g. "May the devil take you!" or "God damn you!", whereas swearing can be any obscenity. Cussing is slang for cursing.

Well, if you are going to define cursing, then I will say that "swearing" involves taking an oath, usually by means of taking the name of a holy person or thing, to witness the truth of what one is saying.

"Hells teeth" is the cleaned up version of "By the of our Lord".
"By" is usually implied. "By God, I swear that what I say is true!"
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"Hells teeth" is the cleaned up version of "By the of our Lord". "By" is usually implied. "By God, I swear that what I say is true!"

What translator are you using?
I'd consider putting a letter up the chimney for a new one if I were you.
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